Biomedical Science (BIOM)

BIOM 100  — Graduate Biomedical Science PA  
0 credits  
BIOM 500M  — Medical Cell Biology and Biochemistry  

Students receive fundamental information regarding the structure and function of cells, how cells are organized into tissues and how molecular mechanisms within the cell drive its replication and function, as well as nutrients and biochemical pathways within cells that drive metabolism, energy usage and generation in cellular and homeostatic processes within humans.

5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 501  — Molecular Basis of Medicine  

The course presents fundamental information regarding biochemistry, molecular biology and medical genetics in a way that is highly practical in today’s clinical and/or research setting. This overview course includes discussions of molecular biology and genetics, metabolism and the body’s production and use of energy, and blood-related issues such as blood proteins, lipoproteins and hemostasis.

7 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 501M  — Medical Cell and Molecular Biology  

Students receive fundamental information regarding the structure and function of cells, how cells are organized into tissues and how molecular mechanisms within the cell drive its replication and function, as well as nutrients and biochemical pathways within cells that drive metabolism, energy usage and generation in cellular and homeostatic processes within humans.

2 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 502  — The Infectious Process  

This course introduces graduate students to fundamental principles of immunology and microbiology. This overview includes discussions of the interplay between the microbial pathogen and the host immune response during the infectious process. Representative microorganisms belonging to each class of pathogen (bacterial, viral, fungal and parasite) are discussed. After the introductory lectures, the focus will be on current topics of interest in infectious disease and public health, including vaccines, cancers with an infectious etiology, and eradication of disease.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 503  — Human Anatomy  

This course provides a comprehensive consideration of the human anatomy as it relates to function in order to provide the anatomical component of diagnosis and treatment. Course objectives include the demonstration of anatomical structural knowledge of all systems in the human body, including musculoskeletal, neuronal, lymphatic, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Emphasis is placed on structural relationships and functional correlations. Learning is facilitated through lecture and group study of anatomical dissections.

6 credits  

Lab/Workshop, Lecture

BIOM 503M  — Medical Microbiology and Immunology  

This course introduces graduate students to fundamental principles of immunology and microbiology. This overview includes discussions of the interplay between the microbial pathogen and the host immune response during the infectious process. Representative microorganisms belonging to each class of pathogen (bacterial, viral, fungal and parasite) are discussed.

4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 504  — Histology  

Students receive fundamental information regarding the structure and function of cells, how cells are organized into tissues and how tissues are organized into organs. In the histology laboratory, students learn to identify cells, tissues and organs through a microscope.

4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 504M  — Ethics and Professionalism  

The student interacts with faculty in discussions and presentations regarding scientific/medical ethics, professional development and career advancement.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 505  — Neurosciences  

This course provides a broad introduction to the basic and clinical neurosciences, including motor function, cerebrovascular blood supply, sensory receptors, higher cortical functions, the limbic system, neurometabolism, and nervous system structure and function.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 505M  — Medical Anatomy  

This course provides a comprehensive consideration of the human anatomy as it relates to function in order to provide the anatomical component of diagnosis and treatment. Course objectives include the demonstration of anatomical structural knowledge of all systems in the human body, including musculoskeletal, neuronal, lymphatic, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Emphasis is placed on structural relationships and functional correlations.

5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 506  — Medical Pharmacology  

This course presents an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of pharmacology. Specific lectures are presented in the areas of pharmacokinetics, autonomic pharmacology, cardiovascular pharmacology, CNS pharmacology and the control of pain.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 506M  — Medical Physiology  

The Medical Physiology course introduces students to the foundational physiological mechanisms underlying the normal function of the human body and thus provides the basis for understanding disease processes. The course covers concepts in normal physiology, as well as selected diseases in the following body systems: Neural, Muscular, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Renal, Gastrointestinal, Endocrine and Reproductive. The goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of human physiology.

4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 507  — Physiology  

This introductory course focused on medical physiology correlates the principles of basic functional mechanisms to practical methods for clinical assessment. Students receive hands-on instruction in methods to evaluate physiological mechanisms in a laboratory setting. Classroom and laboratory instruction are correlated to enhance understanding of cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle physiology, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal physiology.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 507M  — Medical Terminology  

Students are taught the meaning of Latin and Greek word roots, suffixes, and prefixes. With the knowledge of these elements, a student is able to interpret and understand a multitude of complex medical terms.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 508M  — Biomedical Anatomy Lab  

This course provides a hands on consideration of the human anatomy as it relates to function. Course objectives include the demonstration of systems in the human body in a laboratory setting. Learning is facilitated through group study of anatomical dissections.

2 credits  
BIOM 509M  — Biostatistics  

Students will learn, review and demonstrate knowledge of statistical concepts through the use of numerous real-life data sets and case studies. Students will have opportunities to practice through in-class discussions, homework exercises and class projects.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 510M  — Neurophysiology  

Students will learn a range of neuroscience related information including development, cell structure, function and signaling, and associated sensory and executive functions. Emphasis will be placed on broad concepts of structure and physiologic function.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 511M  — Journal Club  

The student gives a multimedia presentation that includes appropriate background, methodology, results, interpretations and conclusions of an original study drawn from the recent peer-reviewed literature. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in critical review and in communicating scientific studies in seminar format.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 512M  — Medical Anatomy II  

This course provides a consideration of the human skull, face, head and basic brain anatomy. Course objectives include the demonstration of anatomical structural knowledge. Emphasis is placed on structural relationships and functional correlations.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 515  — Medical Law Health Care Ethics  
1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 549G  — Scientific Communication  

This course is designed to teach basic scientific communications skills that are crucial to the success of graduate students in the biomedical sciences. Various communication topics and strategies will be addressed in class. Students will be trained to read, interpret and use various formats to communicate scientific information from primary scientific literature. Practice opportunities and critiques will be provided.

2 credits  
BIOM 550G  — Research Survey Seminar  

The goal of this course is for the student to gain a view into cutting-edge research by surveying current research from the perspectives of basic scientific thinking, hypothesis development and testing, and interpretation of data. Students are trained in research approaches to relevant problems and consider which experiments might best address the question. Topics include: how a hypothesis is developed from existing data, how experiments are chosen to address specific hypotheses, and how the data are interpreted.

0 credits  
BIOM 552G  — Basic Concepts Biostatistics & Epidemiology  
3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 553G  — Basic Concepts Biomedical Model  

This course is designed to assist the student with developing a functional understanding of basic biochemical, cellular and systems physiologic processes through application of basic physical and chemical principles. The course builds on principles with which students are familiar from prerequisite coursework. Students examine and analyze how these principles have been modified to model cellular and human physiologic systems. Practical examples are used to both explain and test student competency. Students are expected to apply literature and database search techniques to identify specific research examples and to develop an appropriate project proposal. Additionally, public presentation, written assignments and testing are used to assess student academic performance.

2 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 554G  — Neuroscience  

This course introduces the student to the field of medical neurosciences including cognition, the senses and the neuromuscular junctions. Emphasis is placed on structural organization and design of the nervous system, supported by the lecture and laboratory approach employed in the Human Gross Anatomy course that precedes this neuroscience experience. Understanding of basic physiologic principles and nervous system design is tested using timed exams that require students to apply their basic knowledge to an analysis of a variety of medically based scenarios.

3, 4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 557G  — Micro Anatomy and Embryology  

The histology component of this course covers basic structure and function of eukaryotic cells, how these cells are organized into four tissue types, and how tissues are organized into organs to support the various systems of the body. The embryology component focuses on gametogenesis through fetal development and explores embryogenesis for each organ system.

4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 558G  — Biochemistry, Cell, & Molecular Biology  

This course provides the basis for understanding concepts of molecular medicine relevant in subsequent coursework in the biomedical sciences. Areas of concentration include biochemistry cell and molecular biology and genetics. Topics include studies of cellular organization; signaling and replication; gene expression and regulation; carbohydrate, lipid, protein and nucleic acid metabolism; enzymes; and mechanisms of inheritance and genetic engineering.

5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 559G  — Biostatistics  

This course introduces the student to basic principles of statistical methods as applied to biomedical research, design and critical reading of the scientific literature. The student is expected to develop ability to use these basic principles to perform simple research data analysis and to interpret data reported in the current scientific research literature. This course in sequence with the new second year course Epidemiology replaces the 3 credit course BIOM 609G – Biostatistics and Epidemiology (formerly BIOM 552G).

2 credits  

Lecture, On Line

BIOM 560G  — Human Anatomy and Physiology I  
5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 562G  — Homeostasis and Organ Systems I  

This is a five credit course that studies the integration of the Anatomy and Physiology of human organ systems. The factual and conceptual aspects of morphology and physiology are learned as a unified narrative. The study of human anatomy and physiology is guided by clinical specialties and the essential knowledge base required for understanding functional organ systems and their interactions. Major challenges to homeostasis will be identified for each specialty. The textbooks are Moore’s Essentials of Clinical Anatomy and Guyton and Hall’s Textbook of Medical Physiology. Laboratory exercises are incorporated as demonstrations and interactive observations in the anatomy lab and the physiology lab. The organ systems or specialties covered include: Dermatology, Neurology (introductory / basic peripheral nervous system), Myology / Osteology, Cardiology, Pulmonology & Otolaryngology. Study of each specialty will incorporate at least two case studies that illustrate the most common diseases or challenges to homeostasis for that system. Also, a case study that may be uncommon but has great educational value for understanding the pathophysiology of that system will be presented.

5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 563G  — Homeostasis and Organ Systems II  

This is a five credit course that continues the study of the integration of the Anatomy and Physiology of human organ systems. The factual and conceptual aspects of morphology and physiology are learned as a unified narrative. The study of human anatomy and physiology is guided by clinical specialties and the essential knowledge base required for understanding functional organ systems and their interactions. Major challenges to homeostasis will be identified for each specialty. The textbooks are Moore’s Essentials of Clinical Anatomy and Guyton and Hall’s Textbook of Medical Physiology. Laboratory exercises are incorporated as demonstrations and interactive observations in the anatomy lab and the physiology lab. The organ systems or specialties covered include: Urology / Renal, Gastroenterology, Endocrinology, Immunology, Gynecology and Male Reproductive System. Study of each specialty will incorporate at least two case studies that illustrate the most common diseases or challenges to homeostasis for that system. Also, a case study that may be uncommon but has great educational value for understanding the pathophysiology of that system will be presented.

5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 567G  — HNRS Micro Anatomy and Embryology  
4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 600G  — Critical Analysis of Research  

This course is designed to enhance and promote critical analysis and communication of scientific findings. Students enrolled in the thesis track will meet on a bimonthly basis for one hour. In the first part of the year, students will present and carefully analyze the results of a scientific article. In the later part of the year, students will present the results from their individual research projects. All students are expected to attend and participate in presentations and discussions of research findings. The purpose of this experience is to augment the student’s skills and competencies specific to the successful completion and presentation of their thesis research requirement for completion of the MS Degree.

0 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 601  — Clinical Neuroscience  

This course will provide exposure to clinical neuroscience with an emphasis on the relationships between brain and behavior. Lectures will focus on the neuroscience of mental health conditions, psychopharmacology, and development and aging. . Students will also gain a patient perspective on living with a neurological illness across the lifespan while interfacing with a medical system. Students will be assessed with exam, discussion posts, as well as a final paper, which will further demonstrate their knowledge. Knowledge of basic brain structure and function are required.

2-5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 601G  — Basic Concepts in Biostatistics and Epidemiology  
3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 601M  — Introduction to Pathology  

The course provides a systematic approach to the pathological basis of medicine. The course begins with an overview of cell injury, death, adaptation, repair and regeneration. It continues with a survey of the dermatological, skeletal, neurological, endocrine, immunological, cardiorespiratory, vascular, gastrointestinal, renal, urological and reproductive systems.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 602  — Seminar  

This course focuses on the presentation of recent literature published in refereed journals. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills in communicating scientific studies; critical review of literature including research design, data interpretation; and recognition of the relationship of previously published studies with the student's current work.

2 credits  
BIOM 602G  — Infection and Immunity  
5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 602M  — Introduction to Pharmacology  

This course provides students with a broad survey of the basic principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. This course reviews the mechanism(s) of action, toxicities and interactions of specific drugs and drug classes.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 603  — Seminar  

This course focuses on the presentation of recent literature published in refereed journals. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills in communication scientific studies; critical review of literature including research design, data analysis and data interpretation; and recognition of the relationship of previously published studies with the student's current work.

2 credits  
BIOM 603G  — Concepts in Pharmacology Toxicology  

This course introduces the student to major concepts used in the study of pharmacology and toxicology. It focuses on drugs used in autonomic and cardiovascular pharmacology and toxicology. The course utilizes a lecture format and several laboratory sessions, one of which involves the use of the patient simulator in the clinical learning laboratory.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 604  — Seminar  

This course focuses on the presentation of recent literature published in refereed journals. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills in communicating scientific studies; critical review of literature including research design, data analysis and data interpretation; and recognition of the relationship of previously published studies with the student's current work.

2 credits  
BIOM 604G  — Nutritional Biochemistry  

This course introduces the student to the foundation of nutrition as it impacts biochemical pathways within the body. This course applies a competency- based approach in which an emphasis is placed on student presentation and active participation in the classroom. Final course evaluation is based on the effectiveness of the student’s classroom participation, prior preparation based on classroom outcomes and a final project that requires the student to design an experimental investigation of a topic of his or her own interest and then to apply his/her knowledge base by developing and generating an appropriate NIH-style grant proposal.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 605G  — Special Topics  

This course number is maintained for use when a one-time need is perceived.

1-5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 606G  — Analytical Reading, Molecular Reading  

The focus of this course is on the elaboration of molecular mechanisms in the current literature. This course requires directed readings and presentations of the current literature, exposing students to high-impact areas of the biomedical sciences and enhancing critical reading and public speaking skills.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 607G  — Independent Study/Scientific Composition  

This course is a graded three term sequence that is a guided independent study in which the student explores the biomedical science basis for health/medical conditions and syndromes that present in the clinic. Under the supervision of a graduate faculty member, the student is required to read and compile current scientific literature on the clinical condition chosen and write a major review article. Students will be required to present their topic in a formal presentation to the program faculty and their class peers. In addition to the presentation, the student must complete a written manuscript that adheres to scientific publication standards. Enrollment in this course requires approval of the program director and identification of a faculty mentor. Course may be substituted for BIOM 650G.

1-4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 607M  — Independent Study, Scientific Composition  

This course is a graded three term sequence that is a guided independent study in which the student explores the biomedical science basis for health/medical conditions and syndromes that present in the clinic. Under the supervision of a graduate faculty member, the student is required to read and compile current scientific literature on the clinical condition chosen and write a major review article. Students will be required to present their topic in a formal presentation to the program faculty and their class peers. In addition to the presentation, the student must complete a written manuscript that adheres to scientific publication standards. Enrollment in this course requires approval of the program director and identification of a faculty mentor. Course may be substituted for BIOM 650G.

1-4 credits  
BIOM 608G  — Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology  
1-4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 609G  — Biostatistics & Epidemiology  
3 credits  
BIOM 610G  — Medical Immunology  

The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response, and the role of the immune system in health and disease. Additional topics will cover immune- mediated pathological processes, tumor immunology and autoimmunity.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 611G  — Medical Microbiology  

This course is designed to provide the student with the basic principles of medical microbiology and infectious disease. Emphasis will be placed on the identification, recognition and pathogenesis of the major medically relevant microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Additional topics will include physiological and epidemiological factors contributing to human infectious disease and an introduction to antimicrobial agents. Note: Medical Immunology and Medical Microbiology as a sequence replace the former second year first term course Immunity and Infection BIOM 602G.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 612G  — Historical Development of Current Themes in Biomedical Research  

The focus of this course is the historical development of current and important research trends through the tracking of an idea or concept from its origins in the original scientific literature to the current applications in cutting edge research. The purpose is for the student to gain an appreciation of how the development of ideas and concepts is essential to the investigation and better understanding across different areas of science. This course requires directed readings and presentations of the current literature, exposing students to high impact areas of the biomedical sciences and enhancing critical reading and interpretation of scientific literature as well as public speaking skills.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 613G  — Molecular Genetics  

The goal of this course is for the student to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular biology techniques introduced in earlier courses. The material will focus on understanding the molecular genetic tools that are having a tremendous impact on medicine. Specific topics will include various types of cloning, gene transfer, methods to study gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels, microRNAs and other recent developments. Prerequisite: BIOM 558G

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 614G  — Developmental Neuroscience  

This course has the goal of providing students with a solid foundation in developmental neuroscience. The student is required to integrate findings from anatomical, cellular, molecular and genetic approaches. Topics covered will include neural induction, regionalization of the neural plate and neural tube, neurogenesis, gliogenesis, cellular determination and differentiation, migration, growth cones and axon pathfinding,dendrite formation, programmed cell death, synapse formation and elimination, critical periods and developmental plasticity. Students are required to have a basic knowledge of cell biology and neuroscience before attempting this course.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 615G  — Vascular Control Mechanisms  

This course guides the student through an advanced study of vascular control mechanisms. The course is designed so that the student examines new advances and current understanding of various aspects of vascular control and is heavily based in current literature. Independent literature research and class participation, in addition to 3 exams, are a significant component of the final grade.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 616G  — Experimental Design and Data Analysis in Biomedical Research  

This course is intended to provide basic training to students about how to start a biological research study with a reasonable experimental design and to apply best practices in data analysis at the end. This course will use examples from molecular biology,electrophysiology and imaging studies to explain how to adopt most currently accepted methods in experimental design and data analysis. Students enrolled in this course are required to have a prerequisite understanding of basic statistics.

2 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 617G  — Human Virology Biology  

This course is a discussion- and debate-based review of current topics in stem cell biology and the uses of stem cells in medicine and biotechnology. Topics include review and discussion of cell biology, developmental biology, molecular biology and genetics; stem cell characteristics and preparation; clinical applications and therapeutic uses of stem cells and tissue engineering; and regulatory and ethical issues. Current peer-reviewed literature provides up-to- date information for classroom discussion.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 618G  — Epidemiology  

This course introduces the student to basic principles of epidemiology as applied to biomedical research, design and critical reading of the scientific literature. The student is expected to develop ability to use these basic principles to perform simple epidemiologic analysis and to interpret studies reported in the current scientific research literature. The students are required to identify measures of disease frequency and excess risk and apply these in the context of epidemiologic questions and problems. Students are also asked to interpret and apply the calculation and application of screening test utilities. Students are expected to master concepts including, but not limited to, morbidity and mortality measures, incidence, prevalence, attack rate, relative risk, odds ratio, positive and negative predictive value, sensitivity and specificity. This course, in sequence with the new first year course Biostatistics (BIOM 559G), replaces the 3 credit course BIOM 609G – Biostatistics and Epidemiology (formerly BIOM 552G)

1 credits  
BIOM 619G  — Medical Microbiology Method Practicum  

This course covers basic concepts of microbiology with emphasis on sterile techniques,staining, antibiotic susceptibility testing, isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms. As a final learning outcome, students are required to apply his/her acquired knowledge and skills to successfully identify a mixture of two unknowns. This course is the competency-based section of BIOM 611G Microbiology and BIOM 610G Medical Immunology course sequence, and students are registered in conjunction with BIOM 611G. Registration for this course as a separate component or registration for BIOM 611G without this competency-based component requires the approval of the program director.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 620G  — Human Viruses Vaccines and Infectious Diseases  

This course is designed to build upon basic molecular genetics principles in order to familiarize the students with the related principles of virology, including structure, biology, replication, pathogenesis and host-cell interactions. The mechanisms of viral adaptation will be utilized as real-time applications of mutation to see how these can be exploited to predict the severity of viral outbreaks and the development of drug resistance. Students will gain an appreciation for the population genetics of infectious diseases, while the control and prevention of infection is a theme that will be discussed throughout the course. Finally, the development of the host innate immune system and viral counterstrategies will be examined. This course is designed to complement the fundamental concepts introduced in Molecular Genetics (BIOM 613G) and Epidemiology (BIOM 618G). Students should successfully both BIOM 613 G and BIOM 618 G before enrolling in this course. Student who have not completed Molecular Genetics and Epidemiology can only register for BIOM XXX G with the prior approval on the course director and program director.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 621G  — Computational Neuroscience  

This course is designed to provide advanced training to students in the study of neuroscience and electrophysiology using a computational approach. Computational neuroscience is an important method in understanding the information content of neural signals by modeling the nervous system at many different levels. This course will review systemic and cellular neurobiology, basic concepts in biophysics, computer languages. Students will be required to perform electrophysiological recordings, construct biological realistic single neuron or network models using popular simulators, and present their models in both writing and speech. Completion of the course requirements will augment important professional skill sets and competencies for students completing the MS Degree and seeking to continue in many areas of scientific research and diagnostics. Basic knowledge in physics and neurobiology is prerequisite. This course is paired with Advanced Cardiovascular, Pulmonary and Renal Physiology.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 622G  — Advanced Cardio Pulmonary Renal Physiology  

This course provides advanced training to students in the study cardiac, cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal physiology elaborating on the ideas of how neural/hormonal feedback mechanisms and local control balance the parameters of pressure volume and cardiac output to adequate insure local and systemic blood flow for the purpose of nutrient delivery and waste removal. Students will explore the complexities of this balance through the examination of physical performance and pathophysiologic scenarios as well as analysis of laboratory research data and evidence base medicine cases. Students will be required to present and explain their analyses using both classic physiologic illustration tools and literature graphics. This course is paired with Computational Neuroscience.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 623  — Integrative Anatomical Skills  
3-5 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 623G  — Integrative Anatomical Skills  
3-4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 624  — Design Thinking in Medical Ed  
3 credits  
BIOM 624G  — Embryological Basis of Disease  

This course is designed to provide advanced comprehension of the underlying embryological mechanisms in human development. Students will examine the genetic, cellular, molecular, and environmental mechanisms that contribute to medically relevant malformations, anomalies, defects, and syndrome of major anatomical systems that occur during embryological/fetal life which impact the cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, urogenital, and head/neck formation. Students will be assigned specific developmental disorders/diseases/malformations and be responsible for discussing and presenting their findings on the assigned topics as individuals and in groups. Over the term, the topics assigned will progress through the major anatomical systems and increase in complexity. The course assumes students have acquired basic knowledge of cell biology and human embryology. Successful completion of Human Embryology is a prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 625  — Small Teaching Strategies  
3 credits  

On Line

BIOM 625G  — Current Challenges in Infectious Diseases  

In today’s increasingly intertwined world, the epidemiology of infectious diseases is dynamic and challenging. This course will introduce students to the theory of identifying and controlling infectious diseases through a study of various pathogens such as Ebola, HIV, Avian Influenza, SARS, MERS, Zika and COVID-19 (among others). Using examples, students will develop an appreciation of disease transmission, epidemiology, the importance of surveillance and outbreak investigation in prevention and control, along with a range of disease control strategies implementable at the individual, local and national levels. Topics of particular note will be those diseases of pandemic potential and an analysis of the factors and activities necessary to reduce their occurrence. A student who has not completed BIOM 618G Epidemiology can only register for this course with prior approval of both the course and program directors.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 626G  — Neurobiology of Disease  
4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 650  — Biomedical Capstone Public Health  
0-6 credits  
BIOM 650G  — Special Topics in Biomedical Science Research and Methods  

This course is a graded three term sequence that is a guided independent study in which the student explores an area of interest in either Biomedical Sciences Research or Methods. The course requires a topic selection to be approved by a mentor/instructor. Students are expected to complete a thesis-style paper of twenty-five pages or more which can be a review, project proposal, grant application, etc. (any proposals require paperwork for appropriate regulatory committees); minimum of 75 citations/references, graded presentation, scheduled weekly meetings with faculty mentor; and competency-based testing and assignment completion. Students may enroll in this course only through the approval of the Program Director. Course may be substituted for BIOM 607G.

1-4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 678  — Scientific Communication Skill  
1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 679  — Capstone: Neurobehavioral Science  

This course will integrate action research with the students acquired knowledge of neuroscience in order to develop an objective perspective of neurological aspects of behavior and the contribution of neuroscience to interventions. Additionally, the student will demonstrate proficiency in written and oral communication skills.

0-6 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 681  — Research Proposal  

This course introduces the student to literature review, hypothesis generation, and research design. The student will form a partnership with a research mentor and thesis committee. Working with the mentor, the student develops a written research plan which must be approved by the committee and program director. If the project requires clearance by any regulatory board (IRB, IACUC, etc.), this course is considered “in progress,” and no grade is issued until such authorization is secured.

0-1 credits  
BIOM 682G  — Research Proposal  
1 credits  
BIOM 682M  — Research Proposal  
1 credits  
BIOM 683  — Thesis Manuscript Development  

The student demonstrates mastery of his or her area of research by writing a viable draft of the thesis manuscript comprising abstract, introduction, background, materials and methods, results, discussion and literature cited. The draft is submitted to and approved by the thesis committee, who schedules the thesis defense in conjunction with the program director. Prerequisites/Corequisites: BIOM 681, BIOM 682, BIOM 693.

1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 683G  — Thesis Manuscript Development  
0-1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 683M  — Thesis Manuscript Development  
0-1 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 685  — Thesis Defense  

The candidate demonstrates mastery of his or her area of research, and biomedical research in general, by delivering a public, seminar-format presentation before the faculty and College community. The audience may question the candidate on matters pertaining to the project and related studies. After the public session, the defense continues with the thesis committee discussing both with the candidate and in private matters that may need to be resolved before the final thesis can be submitted. Prerequisites/Corequisites: BIOM 683, BIOM 693.

0-2 credits  
BIOM 687  — Thesis Completion  

The candidate revises the written thesis as required by the thesis committee and library guidelines, secures committee approval, and submits the thesis in its final form to the program director, who will then recommend the candidate for degree conferral. This course is considered “in progress” and no grade issued until the final thesis is submitted. At the end of each term that the thesis is not submitted, the candidate must develop an action plan in consultation with the thesis committee and program director; additional fees may be incurred. Thesis status cannot be registered after thesis has been defended. Prerequisite/Corequisite: BIOM 685.

1 credits  
BIOM 687G  — Thesis Completion  
0 credits  
BIOM 690  — Research Methods  

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of epidemiology and research design in health and disease. Principles of evidence-based medicine are discussed as they relate to key areas of disease prevention, health promotion and therapy discussed. Community-based issues, problems and solutions are addressed. Students who complete the course will be able to understand and apply basic statistical terms and applications as well as various research design models that appear in current medical literature. Students learn to assess the quality of medical literature research designs to study commonly encountered clinical and community issues. Students will learn to describe the relationship between the medical literature and evidence-based medicine. This course is cross-listed with PHYA 542.

1-2 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 690G  — Research Methods Practical Experience in Biomedical Science  

This course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding and practical experience in research and experimental principles and methods. Students are given the opportunity to conduct experiments related to cell and molecular biology and keep a written record of all research experiments performed. Experiments complement the existing curriculum taught in cell and molecular biology and as such, should help the student gain additional understanding of the material and the techniques used to address questions in basic science research. Complementary to their laboratory-based assignments, students are provided with the requisite background information they will need in order to understand the purpose of each experiment.

4 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 691  — Biomedical Research  

The student undertakes mentored research leading to the degree of Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences. Students learn lab techniques and review the relevant literature with the goal of understanding not only the “how” but the “why” of their project.If the project has met all regulatory requirements, data collection may commence. This course may be taken in one or more terms for up to seven total credits, and includes at minimum one meeting of the full thesis committee per term.

1-8 credits  
BIOM 691G  — Biomedical Science Research  

Supervised individual research projects undertaken by students in the program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences.

1-8 credits  
BIOM 691M  — Biomedical Research  
1-8 credits  
BIOM 692  — Biomedical Research  

The student continues mentored research leading to the degree of Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences. This course may be taken in one or more terms for up to nine total credits, and includes at minimum one meeting of the full thesis committee per term. Prerequisites: BIOM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 681, 690, 691.

1-8 credits  
BIOM 692G  — Biomed Research  

Supervised individual research projects undertaken by students in the program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences.

1-8 credits  
BIOM 693  — Biomedical Research  

Mentored research that brings the project to a conclusion as approved by the thesis committee, such that it may be presented in written and oral form. This course may be taken in one or more terms for up to nine credits per term, and includes at minimum one meeting of the full thesis committee per term. Prerequisite: BIOM 692.

1-10 credits  
BIOM 693G  — Biomed Research  

Supervised individual research projects undertaken by students in the program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences.

1-8 credits  
BIOM 694  — Biomedical Research  
1-9 credits  
BIOM 694G  — Thesis  

This option allows for a student to be enrolled in a topic specific independent study which can be a unique elective topical study or a Biomedical Science course specific course offering in an independent study format. Biomedical Sciences Graduate course letter grading scales are applied and the instructor and student agree to a written set of grading criteria before course begins. Offering of this course is based on instructor and program resource availability and requires the approval of the program director.

1-8 credits  
BIOM 697G  — Capstone Continuation  
1 credits  
BIOM 698G  — Independent Study  
1-6 credits  
BIOM 698M  — Directed Studies  
BIOM 699  — Thesis Continuation  

This course is designed to allow students who have not completed their thesis during the normally allotted time to register and complete their thesis.

BIOM 699G  — Biostatistics Epidemiology  

This course is designed to allow students who have not completed their thesis during the normally allotted time to register and complete their thesis.

3 credits  

Lecture

BIOM 997  — Thesis Paper Completion  
0 credits  
BIOM 997G  — Thesis Paper Completion  
1 credits