Osteopathic Medicine (DO)

DO 100  — Cellular and Biochemical Foundations of Medicine  

Cellular and Biochemical Foundations of Medicine is a 13 week course that presents to first year medical learners the foundational components of cellular processes and biochemical pathways that are vital to understanding and treating disease. During this course, core concepts presented include cell regulation, biochemical processes, histology, nutrition, metabolism, genetics, and development.

6 credits  

Lecture

DO 101  — Infection and Immunity  

Infection and Immunity is a 13 week course that presents to first year medical learners the foundational components of the immune system and the subsequent interactions with the various microbes that are essential to both preventing and treating human disease. During this course, topics presented include bacterial infection, fungal infections, viral infections, parasitic infections, zoonotic infections, inflammation, the normal immune response to microbial infection, autoimmune conditions, and immunodeficiency.

6 credits  

Lecture

DO 102  — Foundations of the Musculoskeletal System and Skin  

Foundations of the Musculoskeletal System and Skin is a 5 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of the musculoskeletal system and integument, especially as they relate to normal structure and function. This information is vital to building the foundation to further understand how pathologic disease can then alter these same processes and how some can be treated with osteopathic manipulative medicine. During this course, learners will be presented with the anatomy, histology, development, and embryology relevant to the musculoskeletal system and integument. This course is aligned with the Foundational Physiology course.

3 credits  

Lecture

DO 103  — Foundational Physiology  

Foundational Physiology is a 5 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of medical physiology that allow the human body to function and maintain homeostasis. This foundational material is vital for an understanding of the innate processes and functions of the body that are altered in pathological disease. During this course, core concepts presented include homeostasis, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, thermoregulation, and the autonomic nervous system.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 104  — Foundations of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Medicine  

Foundations of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Medicine is a 3 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, especially as it relates to normal structure and function. This information is vital to building the foundation to further understand how pathologic disease can then alter these same processes. During this course, learners will be presented with the anatomy, physiology, histology, development, and embryology relevant to the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems.

3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 105  — Foundations of Renal, Endocrine, and Gastrointestinal Medicine  

Foundations of Renal/Endocrine/Gastrointestinal Medicine is a 5 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of the renal, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems, especially as they relate to normal structure and function. This information is vital to building the foundation to further understand how pathologic disease can then alter these same processes. During this course, learners will be presented with the anatomy, physiology, histology, development, and embryology relevant to the renal, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems.

3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 106  — Foundations of Research  

Foundations of Research is a 13 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of research, and the ability to apply them to both future research endeavors and their clinical practice. During this course, learners will be exposed to a variety of topics ranging from research design and methodologies, statistical methods, data analysis, literature navigation, and source evaluation.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 107  — Foundations of Reproductive and Genitourinary Medicine  

Foundations of Reproductive and Genitourinary Medicine is a 2 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of the reproductive and genitourinary systems, especially as they relate to normal structure and function. This information is vital to building the foundation to further understand how pathologic disease can then alter these same processes. During this course, learners will be presented with the anatomy, physiology, histology, development, and embryology relevant to the reproductive and genitourinary systems.

2 credits  

Lecture

DO 108  — HEENT and Neuroscience  

HEENT and Neuroscience I is a 5 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of the essential components of the HEENT system and its relation to neuroscience, especially as they relate to normal structure and function. This information is vital to building the foundation to further understand how pathologic disease can then alter these same processes. During this course, learners will be presented with the anatomy, physiology, histology, development, and embryology relevant to the HEENT and nervous systems.

4 credits  

Lecture

DO 109  — Introduction to Human Disease and Therapeutics  

Introduction to Human Disease and Therapeutics is a 6 week course that presents to first year medical learners the opportunity to gain an understanding of how pathological processes can alter normal system functions, as well as the pharmacologic principles governing the effects of drugs used by physicians to treat disease. During this course, learners will be exposed to a variety of topics including cellular injury, cellular repair, inflammation, cellular dysplasia, neoplasia, and a brief introduction to the pathophysiology of the various systems. Additional topics covered include pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and the pharmacology of select drug classes.

5.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 113A  — Medical Humanities I  

Part 1: Narrative Medicine In this course, students identify and develop narrative skills and techniques that doctors and other clinicians use in practice, through the close study of narratives (poems, fiction, essays, films, etc.) and discussion of key texts in narrative medicine. Part 2: Community Experience This course fosters students’ development into humanistic physicians through engagement in community activities, reflective opportunities and the humanities such as narrative medicine, art, theatre and music. Students will engage in 3 reflective humanities related experiences within the larger community in order to foster their development into humanistic physicians.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 113B  — Medical Humanities II  

Part 1: Narrative Medicine In this course, students identify and develop narrative skills and techniques that doctors and other clinicians use in practice, through the close study of narratives (poems, fiction, essays, films, etc.) and discussion of key texts in narrative medicine. Part 2: Community Experience This course fosters students’ development into humanistic physicians through engagement in community activities, reflective opportunities and the humanities such as narrative medicine, art, theatre and music. Students will engage in 3 reflective humanities related experiences within the larger community in order to foster their development into humanistic physicians.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 113C  — Medical Humanities III  

Part 1: Narrative Medicine In this course, students identify and develop narrative skills and techniques that doctors and other clinicians use in practice, through the close study of narratives (poems, fiction, essays, films, etc.) and discussion of key texts in narrative medicine. Part 2: Community Experience This course fosters students’ development into humanistic physicians through engagement in community activities, reflective opportunities and the humanities such as narrative medicine, art, theatre and music. Students will engage in 3 reflective humanities related experiences within the larger community in order to foster their development into humanistic physicians.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 129A  — Wellness I  

The PCOM Wellness Course is a longitudinal course spanning all three terms of the first year with a Pass/Fail grade awarded at the end of each term. The purpose of this course is to become familiar with the eight (8) domains of wellness (physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, vocational, financial, and environmental) to enhance the students’ personal wellness and to provide a foundation for incorporating wellness strategies in patient care which aligns with the osteopathic holistic philosophy. The course incorporates the use of CoreWellness©, a comprehensive online curriculum designed to provide students with the practical skills they need to manage stress and other lifestyle factors during their medical training. Content is delivered by lecture, active learning, assigned readings, and other assignments. Assessment is based on attendance, participation, and completion of assignments and quizzes.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 129B  — Wellness II  

The PCOM Wellness Course is a longitudinal course spanning all three terms of the first year with a Pass/Fail grade awarded at the end of each term. The purpose of this course is to become familiar with the eight (8) domains of wellness (physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, vocational, financial, and environmental) to enhance the students’ personal wellness and to provide a foundation for incorporating wellness strategies in patient care which aligns with the osteopathic holistic philosophy. The course incorporates the use of CoreWellness©, a comprehensive online curriculum designed to provide students with the practical skills they need to manage stress and other lifestyle factors during their medical training. Content is delivered by lecture, active learning, assigned readings, and other assignments. Assessment is based on attendance, participation, and completion of assignments and quizzes.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 129C  — Wellness III  

The PCOM Wellness Course is a longitudinal course spanning all three terms of the first year with a Pass/Fail grade awarded at the end of each term. The purpose of this course is to become familiar with the eight (8) domains of wellness (physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, vocational, financial, and environmental) to enhance the students’ personal wellness and to provide a foundation for incorporating wellness strategies in patient care which aligns with the osteopathic holistic philosophy. The course incorporates the use of CoreWellness©, a comprehensive online curriculum designed to provide students with the practical skills they need to manage stress and other lifestyle factors during their medical training. Content is delivered by lecture, active learning, assigned readings, and other assignments. Assessment is based on attendance, participation, and completion of assignments and quizzes.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 134G  — Cardiovascular Pulmonary and Renal Medicine  

Cardiovascular, Pulmonary and Renal Medicine is a multidisciplinary, integrated course designed to take the student in an introductory manner through the specific physiologic and pharmacologic mechanisms, pathologic descriptions, pharmacologic interventions and applications, diagnostic specifics, therapeutic strategies and other relevant medical issues of each system and the crossover issues between systems. This course links the anatomy of the three systems to an integrated presentation of physiology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, imaging and general medicine of each of the systems as well as cross-system complications. Clinical scenarios are presented in order to provide examples that allow the students to draw connections between basic science mechanisms and clinical application. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of how structural aberration results in functional change and the recognition of how symptoms are indicative of positive (system compensation) and negative (pathological) functional change. Students are expected to apply their basic knowledge of each system to develop an understanding of how a pathological process affecting one of the three systems can and will eventually create pathological processes in the other two.

12 credits  

Lecture

DO 138CG  — Preventive and Community Based Medicine III  

(Part 3) This course introduces the future osteopathic physician to clinical preventive medicine and community-based medicine and focuses on the critical components of physician responsibility and advocacy in the development and delivery of health care systems in the United States. This year long course presents the fundamentals of evidence-based medicine, biostatistics, epidemiology, ethics, preventive medicine, public health, community medicine, infection prevention and control, environmental medicine, toxicology, occupational medicine, and disaster and emergency planning. The critical need for physician advocacy within the context of socio-cultural, economic, marketing and political competence is explored. Concepts and strategies from epidemiology, including bio-statistical analysis of current research studies, are applied to real case studies of community issues relevant to physician responsibilities. Current medico-legal, ethical and political issues are studied in terms of options for physician advocacy and responsibility to the community.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 139A  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice I  

(Part 1) This course introduces concepts and philosophy of osteopathic medicine; fundamentals in the art of clinical patient observation, palpation and evaluation; surface anatomical landmarks identified as foundation for future coursework in manual medicine as well as for primary care skills; physiologic motions of spine; clinical evaluation skills in active and passive motion; regional and intersegmental motion testing. Somatic dysfunction is defined. Common musculoskeletal patient complaints, their osteopathic diagnosis and management are discussed. Therapeutic skills are developed of soft-tissue, myofascial release and counter strain osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT); differentiating the basis for myofascial techniques and reflex-oriented techniques; physiologic motion of the thoracic spine and rib cage as well as the biomechanical actions of the respiratory muscles; thoracic and costal somatic dysfunction clinical cases; scoliosis defined, osteopathic management of various scoliosis types; regional muscle energy and HVLA; introduction to viscero-somatic, somatic-visceral, somatic-somatic, and psychosomatic reflexes and their relevance to health and disease; pain and referred pain implications and management.

2.5 credits  
DO 139B  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice II  

(Part 2) This course introduces concepts and philosophy of osteopathic medicine; fundamentals in the art of clinical patient observation, palpation and evaluation; surface anatomical landmarks identified as foundation for future coursework in manual medicine as well as for primary care skills; physiologic motions of spine; clinical evaluation skills in active and passive motion; regional and intersegmental motion testing. Somatic dysfunction is defined. Common musculoskeletal patient complaints, their osteopathic diagnosis and management are discussed. Therapeutic skills are developed of soft-tissue, myofascial release and counter strain osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT); differentiating the basis for myofascial techniques and reflex-oriented techniques; physiologic motion of the thoracic spine and rib cage as well as the biomechanical actions of the respiratory muscles; thoracic and costal somatic dysfunction clinical cases; scoliosis defined, osteopathic management of various scoliosis types; regional muscle energy and HVLA; introduction to viscero-somatic, somatic-visceral, somatic-somatic, and psychosomatic reflexes and their relevance to health and disease; pain and referred pain implications and management.

2 credits  
DO 139C  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice III  

(Part 3) This course introduces concepts and philosophy of osteopathic medicine; fundamentals in the art of clinical patient observation, palpation and evaluation; surface anatomical landmarks identified as foundation for future coursework in manual medicine as well as for primary care skills; physiologic motions of spine; clinical evaluation skills in active and passive motion; regional and intersegmental motion testing. Somatic dysfunction is defined. Common musculoskeletal patient complaints, their osteopathic diagnosis and management are discussed. Therapeutic skills are developed of soft-tissue, myofascial release and counter strain osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT); differentiating the basis for myofascial techniques and reflex-oriented techniques; physiologic motion of the thoracic spine and rib cage as well as the biomechanical actions of the respiratory muscles; thoracic and costal somatic dysfunction clinical cases; scoliosis defined, osteopathic management of various scoliosis types; regional muscle energy and HVLA; introduction to viscero-somatic, somatic-visceral, somatic-somatic, and psychosomatic reflexes and their relevance to health and disease; pain and referred pain implications and management.

2 credits  
DO 140A  — Primary Care Skills I  

(Part 1) The Primary Care Skills I, II, and III course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients, understand the patient experience, obtain an accurate history, perform a physical examination, and properly document the medical record. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, standardized patient sessions, and a shadowing experience in an ambulatory center are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 140B  — Primary Care Skills II  

(Part 2) The Primary Care Skills I, II, and III course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients, understand the patient experience, obtain an accurate history, perform a physical examination, and properly document the medical record. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, standardized patient sessions, and a shadowing experience in an ambulatory center are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 140C  — Primary Care Skills III  

(Part 3) The Primary Care Skills I, II, and III course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients, understand the patient experience, obtain an accurate history, perform a physical examination, and properly document the medical record. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, standardized patient sessions, and a shadowing experience in an ambulatory center are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 144A  — Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I  

Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I is a yearlong longitudinal course that presents medical learners the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the interplay and integration of foundational science material and how to apply it to clinical medicine. Through various active learning modules, learners will develop the critical thought processes that are vital to clinical reasoning and selection of disease treatments, by fostering and applying their understanding of foundational science that is the underpinning of these processes.

1 credits  
DO 144AG  — Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I  
1 credits  

Lecture

DO 144B  — Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I  

Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I is a yearlong longitudinal course that presents medical learners the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the interplay and integration of foundational science material and how to apply it to clinical medicine. Through various active learning modules, learners will develop the critical thought processes that are vital to clinical reasoning and selection of disease treatments, by fostering and applying their understanding of foundational science that is the underpinning of these processes.

1 credits  
DO 144BG  — Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I  
1 credits  

Lecture

DO 144C  — Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I  

Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I is a yearlong longitudinal course that presents medical learners the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the interplay and integration of foundational science material and how to apply it to clinical medicine. Through various active learning modules, learners will develop the critical thought processes that are vital to clinical reasoning and selection of disease treatments, by fostering and applying their understanding of foundational science that is the underpinning of these processes.

1 credits  
DO 144CG  — Clinical Reasoning in Basic Science I  
1 credits  

Lecture

DO 145  — Clinical Reason in Basic Science II  

The development of critical reasoning and the integration of basic and clinical science concepts are fostered in students through small group learning activities utilizing written clinical cases. The cases incorporate history and physical findings, laboratory values, imaging, electrophysiology and histopathological images as needed for students to develop an appropriate differential diagnosis. Basic science underpinnings of each case, particularly the pathophysiology of disease are explored by students as guided by specific learning objectives. Student progress in critical thinking and integration of basic and clinical science concepts is assessed by various means as outlined in the respective syllabi for each campus. Assessment tools include an oral examination, a thorough literature search as evidenced in the bibliography, and peer assessment of teammates’ interpersonal communication skills and professionalism.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 145M  — Clinicl Reason in Basic Sci II  

The development of critical reasoning and the integration of basic and clinical science concepts are fostered in students through small group learning activities utilizing written clinical cases. The cases incorporate history and physical findings, laboratory values, imaging, electrophysiology and histopathological images as needed for students to develop an appropriate differential diagnosis. Basic science underpinnings of each case, particularly the pathophysiology of disease are explored by students as guided by specific learning objectives. Student progress in critical thinking and integration of basic and clinical science concepts is assessed by various means as outlined in the respective syllabi for each campus. Assessment tools include an oral examination, a thorough literature search as evidenced in the bibliography, and peer assessment of teammates’ interpersonal communication skills and professionalism.

1 credits  
DO 146A  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

The purpose of the CBSRS course is to assist students in their preparation for the COMLEX Level 1 examination, by mandatory and structured usage of question banks, and other formative assessment tools. Student progress is monitored by faculty, and students may be counseled regarding preparation strategies if necessary.

1 credits  
DO 146AG  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  
1 credits  
DO 146AM  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

The purpose of the CBSRS course is to assist students in their preparation for the COMLEX Level 1 examination, by mandatory and structured usage of question banks, and other formative assessment tools. Student progress is monitored by faculty, and students may be counseled regarding preparation strategies if necessary.

1 credits  
DO 146B  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

The purpose of the CBSRS course is to assist students in their preparation for the COMLEX Level 1 examination, by mandatory and structured usage of question banks, and other formative assessment tools. Student progress is monitored by faculty, and students may be counseled regarding preparation strategies if necessary.

1 credits  
DO 146BG  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  
1 credits  
DO 146BM  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

The purpose of the CBSRS course is to assist students in their preparation for the COMLEX Level 1 examination, by mandatory and structured usage of question banks, and other formative assessment tools. Student progress is monitored by faculty, and students may be counseled regarding preparation strategies if necessary.

1 credits  
DO 146C  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

The purpose of the CBSRS course is to assist students in their preparation for the COMLEX Level 1 examination, by mandatory and structured usage of question banks, and other formative assessment tools. Student progress is monitored by faculty, and students may be counseled regarding preparation strategies if necessary.

1 credits  
DO 146CG  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  
1 credits  
DO 146CM  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

The purpose of the CBSRS course is to assist students in their preparation for the COMLEX Level 1 examination, by mandatory and structured usage of question banks, and other formative assessment tools. Student progress is monitored by faculty, and students may be counseled regarding preparation strategies if necessary.

1 credits  
DO 146G  — Comprehensive Basic Science Review and Synthesis  

This course focuses on key concepts in basic and clinical science which students have learned in didactic courses, and for which comprehension is essential for success on the COMLEX-1 national board exam and clinical rotations. Assessment of student progress toward readiness for board passage is done through the use of the COMBANK q-bank. The student’s activity on the q-bank is monitored by faculty. Students who fail to progress adequately in one or more disciplines are assigned a faculty mentor, and may be required to do remedial work.

.5 credits  
DO 190E  — Culinary Medicine  
.5-1 credits  

Lecture

DO 190EG  — Culinary Medicine  
1 credits  

Lecture

DO 190EM  — Culinary Medicine  
1 credits  

Lecture

DO 212  — Gastroenterological Sciences  

The Gastrointestinal Sciences course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting these organs and the differential diagnosis of each. The microbiology of common pathogens affecting this system is presented. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 212G  — Gastroenterology  

In the GI course, the basic pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal system is presented. Lecturers present a compendium of diseases of the gastrointestinal system, including the common and uncommon gastrointestinal conditions, biliary metabolism, and infections and infestations of the liver and gut and their pharmacologic management. Clinical lectures emphasize diagnosis, imaging, medical and surgical management of gastrointestinal diseases.

4 credits  

Lecture

DO 212M  — Gastroenterological Science  

The Gastrointestinal Sciences course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting these organs and the differential diagnosis of each. The microbiology of common pathogens affecting this system is presented. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 213  — Reproductive Genitourinary and Obstetrics, Gynecologic Medicine  

The Reproductive and Genitourinary Medicine course, presented to second year osteopathic medical students, begins with a discussion of the anatomic and physiologic changes that occur in the female reproductive system, including the breasts, during the various stages of life. Subsequently, the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory/infectious, neoplastic, developmental, traumatic, and hormonal diseases affecting the female reproductive system are presented. The differential diagnosis of each disorder and the microbiology of common pathogens affecting this system are presented. During the obstetrics portion of the course, the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of diseases occurring during pregnancy and those affecting the fetus are introduced. The final component of this course is devoted to the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting the urologic system and the male reproductive system. The differential diagnosis of each disorder and the microbiology of common pathogens affecting these systems are presented. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat disorders of these systems focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

7 credits  

Lecture

DO 213G  — Reproductive Medicine  

In the reproductive/genitourinary course, a review of human reproductive physiology is followed by lectures on pathophysiology of gynecological diseases including sexually transmitted diseases, their management and prevention. Diagnostic and operative gynecology procedures are presented. Lectures on the progress and management of normal pregnancy are presented and management of the various presentations and mechanisms of labor is stressed. This is followed by studies of the pathology of pregnancy, diagnostic methods and treatment. Family planning, contraception, infertility, perinatal infections and gynecologic oncology and pharmacology associated with women’s health issues are also presented. Consideration of disorders and diseases of the male genitourinary system, their diagnosis and management completes the course.

6 credits  

Lecture

DO 213M  — Reproductive and Genitourinary Medicine  

The Reproductive and Genitourinary Medicine course, presented to second year osteopathic medical students, begins with a discussion of the anatomic and physiologic changes that occur in the female reproductive system, including the breasts, during the various stages of life. Subsequently, the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory/infectious, neoplastic, developmental, traumatic, and hormonal diseases affecting the female reproductive system are presented. The differential diagnosis of each disorder and the microbiology of common pathogens affecting this system are presented. During the obstetrics portion of the course, the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of diseases occurring during pregnancy and those affecting the fetus are introduced. The final component of this course is devoted to the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting the urologic system and the male reproductive system. The differential diagnosis of each disorder and the microbiology of common pathogens affecting these systems are presented. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat disorders of these systems focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

7 credits  

Lecture

DO 214G  — Musculoskeletal Skin  

This course covers the clinical areas of orthopedics, rheumatology and dermatology as well as the pathology of diseases of the bones, joints and muscles. Basic skills and academic knowledge in orthopedics are presented to aid clerkship students in the evaluation of routine orthopedic problems. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and treatment of common disorders of the neck, spine, shoulders, hips and extremities. The rheumatology lectures cover inflammatory diseases of joints and connective tissues. Etiology, presentation, differential diagnosis and treatment are stressed. The dermatology lectures prepare the student for diagnosis and management of routine cutaneous diseases.

4 credits  

Lecture

DO 215G  — Psychiatry  

The psychiatry course begins with the history and evolution of psychiatry and the prominent theories of the mind and the causes of emotional illness. Evaluation of the psychiatrically ill patient and principles of psychiatric diagnosis are taught. The neurobiological basis of psychiatric disease and its treatment is discussed. The relationship between brain function and psychiatric illness is a continuing discussion throughout this unit. Topics presented include neuropharmacology, mood disorders, psychosis, substance abuse disorders, and child and adolescent psychiatry.

2 credits  

Lecture

DO 221  — Clinical Endocrinology  

The Clinical Endocrinology course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the endocrine system. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory/autoimmune, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases of endocrine disorders and the differential diagnosis of each. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

2.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 221G  — Endocrinology  
3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 221M  — Clinical Endocrinology  

The Clinical Endocrinology course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the endocrine system. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory/autoimmune, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases of endocrine disorders and the differential diagnosis of each. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

2.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 222  — Clinical and Basic Neuroscience  

The Clinical & Basic Neurosciences course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the nervous system, including the eye. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, degenerative, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting these organs and the differential diagnosis of each. The role of medical imaging in diagnosis and management is introduced. The microbiology of common pathogens affecting this system is presented. This course also introduces the major psychiatric disorders, including those that disproportionately affect the geriatric population. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

7 credits  

Lecture

DO 222M  — Clinical and Basic Neuroscience  

The Clinical & Basic Neurosciences course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the nervous system, including the eye. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, degenerative, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting these organs and the differential diagnosis of each. The role of medical imaging in diagnosis and management is introduced. The microbiology of common pathogens affecting this system is presented. This course also introduces the major psychiatric disorders, including those that disproportionately affect the geriatric population. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

7 credits  

Lecture

DO 224  — Musculoskeletal Skin  

The Musculoskeletal Skin course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the musculoskeletal system and the skin. The first half of this course is devoted to the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory/autoimmune, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting the skin, as well as dermatological manifestations of systemic disease, and the differential diagnosis of each. The microbiology of common skin pathogens is presented. The second half of this course is devoted to the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system, as well as the major rheumatologic disorders. The differential diagnosis of each disorder is presented. The role of medical imaging in diagnosis and management is introduced. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat disorders of both systems focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 224M  — Muscoloskeletal Skin  

The Musculoskeletal Skin course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the musculoskeletal system and the skin. The first half of this course is devoted to the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory/autoimmune, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting the skin, as well as dermatological manifestations of systemic disease, and the differential diagnosis of each. The microbiology of common skin pathogens is presented. The second half of this course is devoted to the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system, as well as the major rheumatologic disorders. The differential diagnosis of each disorder is presented. The role of medical imaging in diagnosis and management is introduced. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat disorders of both systems focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

3.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 226G  — Hematology and Oncology  
2 credits  

Lecture

DO 230G  — Clinical Neuroscience/Neurology  
5 credits  

Lecture

DO 235  — Emergency Medicine  

This course consists of small-group discussions and evaluation of case-based scenarios in the emergency setting; common emergencies review organ systems and clinical response to emergent conditions; student-led discussion with faculty facilitation.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 235M  — Emergency Medicine  

This course consists of small-group discussions and evaluation of case-based scenarios in the emergency setting; common emergencies review organ systems and clinical response to emergent conditions; student-led discussion with faculty facilitation.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 237  — Foundations of Pulmonary Medicine  

The Foundations of Pulmonary Medicine course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the respiratory system. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting this organ system and the differential diagnosis of each. The role of medical imaging in diagnosis and management is introduced. The microbiology of common respiratory pathogens is presented. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

4 credits  

Lecture

DO 237M  — Foundations of Pulmonary Medicine  

The Foundations of Pulmonary Medicine course presents to second year osteopathic medical students a multidisciplinary approach to disease states affecting the respiratory system. The primary focus of the course is the underlying pathophysiology and pathologies of inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, developmental or traumatic diseases affecting this organ system and the differential diagnosis of each. The role of medical imaging in diagnosis and management is introduced. The microbiology of common respiratory pathogens is presented. The pharmacology of drugs used to treat these disorders focuses on mechanism of action, rationale for usage, indications, contraindications and adverse effect profile.

4 credits  

Lecture

DO 238A  — Preventive and Community Based Medicine I  

The Preventive and Community-Based Medicine (PCBM) course introduces osteopathic medical students to the knowledge and competencies related to professionalism in the practice of Osteopathic Medicine and the subspecialty of Public Health/Preventive Medicine. Term 1 focuses on professionalism with a focus on medical ethics, medical law, and sociocultural topics including implicit bias in the practice of medicine. Term 2 provides content related to biostatistics and epidemiology; the healthcare delivery and payment system; and chronic and infectious disease prevention and control. In addition to didactics, this course will utilize case studies and small group learning to emphasize the evidence-based medicine approach to patient care that is guided by the physician’s ethical and professional responsibilities to their patients, community, and society.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 238AM  — Preventive and Community Based Medicine I  

The Preventive and Community-Based Medicine (PCBM) course introduces osteopathic medical students to the knowledge and competencies related to professionalism in the practice of Osteopathic Medicine and the subspecialty of Public Health/Preventive Medicine. Term 1 focuses on professionalism with a focus on medical ethics, medical law, and sociocultural topics including implicit bias in the practice of medicine. Term 2 provides content related to biostatistics and epidemiology; the healthcare delivery and payment system; and chronic and infectious disease prevention and control. In addition to didactics, this course will utilize case studies and small group learning to emphasize the evidence-based medicine approach to patient care that is guided by the physician’s ethical and professional responsibilities to their patients, community, and society.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 238B  — Preventive and Community Based Medicine II  

The Preventive and Community-Based Medicine (PCBM) course introduces osteopathic medical students to the knowledge and competencies related to professionalism in the practice of Osteopathic Medicine and the subspecialty of Public Health/Preventive Medicine. Term 1 focuses on professionalism with a focus on medical ethics, medical law, and sociocultural topics including implicit bias in the practice of medicine. Term 2 provides content related to biostatistics and epidemiology; the healthcare delivery and payment system; and chronic and infectious disease prevention and control. In addition to didactics, this course will utilize case studies and small group learning to emphasize the evidence-based medicine approach to patient care that is guided by the physician’s ethical and professional responsibilities to their patients, community, and society.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 238BM  — Preventive and Community Based Medicine II  

The Preventive and Community-Based Medicine (PCBM) course introduces osteopathic medical students to the knowledge and competencies related to professionalism in the practice of Osteopathic Medicine and the subspecialty of Public Health/Preventive Medicine. Term 1 focuses on professionalism with a focus on medical ethics, medical law, and sociocultural topics including implicit bias in the practice of medicine. Term 2 provides content related to biostatistics and epidemiology; the healthcare delivery and payment system; and chronic and infectious disease prevention and control. In addition to didactics, this course will utilize case studies and small group learning to emphasize the evidence-based medicine approach to patient care that is guided by the physician’s ethical and professional responsibilities to their patients, community, and society.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 238C  — Preventive and Community Based Medicine III  

(Part 3) The goal of this course is to introduce future osteopathic physicians to medical ethics, evidence-based medicine, public health and health policy. Emphasis will be placed on developing an evidence-based medicine approach to patient care that is guided by the physician’s ethical and professional responsibilities to their patients, community and society. This course will use various teaching methods, including small group sessions, case discussions, role-playing, standardized patient encounters, online teaching and lectures.

1-3 credits  

Lecture

DO 238CM  — Prevent and Com Based Med III  
1 credits  

Lecture

DO 239A  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice II  

The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OPP) IV,V, and VI develops the knowledge of pelvic and lumbar reviewed; physiologic motion patterns; sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions; OMT (muscle energy and HVLA) for these dysfunctions; somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to abdomen, sacrum, and pelvis with clinical correlation in reproductive, obstetric/ gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and urogenital disorders. Introduction to osteopathic principles in the cranial field is explored (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed; as well as muscle energy, HVLA, counterstrain and FPR techniques related to limbs, shoulders and hips.

2 credits  

Lecture

DO 239AG  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice IV  

The pelvic and lumbar areas are reviewed, as well as the physiologic motion patterns that pertain to these areas. Sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions are discussed, and OMT for these dysfunctions is presented. The somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to these areas are also presented with clinical correlation in OB/GYN, GI and renal disease. Muscle energy and HVLA techniques for specific dysfunctions in these areas are presented.

1.5 credits  
DO 239AM  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice IV  

The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OPP) IV,V, and VI develops the knowledge of pelvic and lumbar reviewed; physiologic motion patterns; sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions; OMT (muscle energy and HVLA) for these dysfunctions; somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to abdomen, sacrum, and pelvis with clinical correlation in reproductive, obstetric/ gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and urogenital disorders. Introduction to osteopathic principles in the cranial field is explored (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed; as well as muscle energy, HVLA, counterstrain and FPR techniques related to limbs, shoulders and hips.

2 credits  

Lecture

DO 239B  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice V  

The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OPP) IV,V, and VI develops the knowledge of pelvic and lumbar reviewed; physiologic motion patterns; sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions; OMT (muscle energy and HVLA) for these dysfunctions; somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to abdomen, sacrum, and pelvis with clinical correlation in reproductive, obstetric/ gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and urogenital disorders. Introduction to osteopathic principles in the cranial field is explored (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed; as well as muscle energy, HVLA, counterstrain and FPR techniques related to limbs, shoulders and hips.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 239BG  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice V  

Introduction to the principles of osteopathy in the cranial field is presented in lecture (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed, and muscle energy, HVLA, counter strain and FPR techniques are covered in the lab sessions.

1.5 credits  
DO 239BM  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice V  

The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OPP) IV,V, and VI develops the knowledge of pelvic and lumbar reviewed; physiologic motion patterns; sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions; OMT (muscle energy and HVLA) for these dysfunctions; somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to abdomen, sacrum, and pelvis with clinical correlation in reproductive, obstetric/ gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and urogenital disorders. Introduction to osteopathic principles in the cranial field is explored (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed; as well as muscle energy, HVLA, counterstrain and FPR techniques related to limbs, shoulders and hips.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 239C  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice VI  

The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OPP) IV,V, and VI develops the knowledge of pelvic and lumbar reviewed; physiologic motion patterns; sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions; OMT (muscle energy and HVLA) for these dysfunctions; somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to abdomen, sacrum, and pelvis with clinical correlation in reproductive, obstetric/ gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and urogenital disorders. Introduction to osteopathic principles in the cranial field is explored (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed; as well as muscle energy, HVLA, counterstrain and FPR techniques related to limbs, shoulders and hips.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 239CG  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice VI  

Lectures and practice sessions are correlated and directed toward the understanding and management of various appendicular problems. Basic principles are taught and practiced along with basic techniques including muscle energy, HVLA and LAS.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 239CM  — Osteopathic Principles and Practice VI  

The Osteopathic Principles and Practice (OPP) IV,V, and VI develops the knowledge of pelvic and lumbar reviewed; physiologic motion patterns; sacral, lumbar and pelvic somatic dysfunctions; OMT (muscle energy and HVLA) for these dysfunctions; somatic and visceral relationships that pertain to abdomen, sacrum, and pelvis with clinical correlation in reproductive, obstetric/ gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and urogenital disorders. Introduction to osteopathic principles in the cranial field is explored (an elective is offered in the third trimester for more complete understanding and practical palpatory diagnosis). Cervical biomechanics and somatic dysfunction are reviewed; as well as muscle energy, HVLA, counterstrain and FPR techniques related to limbs, shoulders and hips.

.5 credits  
DO 240A  — Primary Care Skills IV  

(Part 1) The Primary Care Skills IV, V, and VI course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients and other medical professionals, utilize the concepts of patient and family- centered care, obtain a comprehensive and focused patient history and physical, document the medical record, and incorporate the concepts of patient safety in medical settings. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, and standardized patient sessions are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 240AG  — Primary Care Skills IV  

(Part 1) This course will introduce Osteopathic medical students to advance level of patient interview techniques and demonstration of physical examination. The course will continue to delineate the structure and components of a medical history with emphasis on competency in interpersonal skills, patient doctor relation/communication, development of assessment and plan in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) method. This course covers advanced physical examination skills, minor surgical skills and problem solving. Ophthalmologic and ENT examinations in the outpatient setting with advanced clinical workshops and case presentations. Small group laboratory instruction in general surgical skills includes sessions on surgical scrub and sterile technique, gloving and gowning, suturing, phlebotomy, IV and catheterization. The department utilizes skill workshops, lectures; small groups case discussions, standardized patient and the simulation model. Standardized patient in Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) evaluation is included at the end of each term.

1 credits  
DO 240AM  — Primary Care Skills IV  

The Primary Care Skills IV, V, and VI course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients and other medical professionals, utilize the concepts of patient and family- centered care, obtain a comprehensive and focused patient history and physical, document the medical record, and incorporate the concepts of patient safety in medical settings. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, and standardized patient sessions are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

1 credits  
DO 240B  — Primary Care Skills V  

(Part 2) The Primary Care Skills IV, V, and VI course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients and other medical professionals, utilize the concepts of patient and family- centered care, obtain a comprehensive and focused patient history and physical, document the medical record, and incorporate the concepts of patient safety in medical settings. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, and standardized patient sessions are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 240BG  — Primary Care Skills V  

(Part 2) This course will introduce Osteopathic medical students to advance level of patient interview techniques and demonstration of physical examination. The course will continue to delineate the structure and components of a medical history with emphasis on competency in interpersonal skills, patient doctor relation/communication, development of assessment and plan in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) method. This course covers advanced physical examination skills, minor surgical skills and problem solving. Ophthalmologic and ENT examinations in the outpatient setting with advanced clinical workshops and case presentations. Small group laboratory instruction in general surgical skills includes sessions on surgical scrub and sterile technique, gloving and gowning, suturing, phlebotomy, IV and catheterization. The department utilizes skill workshops, lectures; small groups case discussions, standardized patient and the simulation model. Standardized patient in Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) evaluation is included at the end of each term.

.5 credits  

Lecture

DO 240BM  — Primary Care Skills V  

The Primary Care Skills IV, V, and VI course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients and other medical professionals, utilize the concepts of patient and family- centered care, obtain a comprehensive and focused patient history and physical, document the medical record, and incorporate the concepts of patient safety in medical settings. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, and standardized patient sessions are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

1 credits  
DO 240C  — Primary Care Skills VI  

(Part 3) The Primary Care Skills IV, V, and VI course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients and other medical professionals, utilize the concepts of patient and family- centered care, obtain a comprehensive and focused patient history and physical, document the medical record, and incorporate the concepts of patient safety in medical settings. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, and standardized patient sessions are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

2 credits  

Lecture

DO 240CG  — Primary Care Skills VI  

(Part 3) This course will introduce Osteopathic medical students to advance level of patient interview techniques and demonstration of physical examination. The course will continue to delineate the structure and components of a medical history with emphasis on competency in interpersonal skills, patient doctor relation/communication, development of assessment and plan in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) method. This course covers advanced physical examination skills, minor surgical skills and problem solving. Ophthalmologic and ENT examinations in the outpatient setting with advanced clinical workshops and case presentations. Small group laboratory instruction in general surgical skills includes sessions on surgical scrub and sterile technique, gloving and gowning, suturing, phlebotomy, IV and catheterization. The department utilizes skill workshops, lectures; small groups case discussions, standardized patient and the simulation model. Standardized patient in Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) evaluation is included at the end of each term.

1 credits  

Lecture

DO 240CM  — Primary Care Skills VI  

The Primary Care Skills IV, V, and VI course develops knowledge, attitudes, and skills in osteopathic medical students to competently communicate with patients and other medical professionals, utilize the concepts of patient and family- centered care, obtain a comprehensive and focused patient history and physical, document the medical record, and incorporate the concepts of patient safety in medical settings. Didactic lectures, skills labs, online modules, and standardized patient sessions are the methods used to teach and evaluate the student competencies.

2 credits  
DO 251  — Introduction to Clinical Medicine  

The Introduction to Clinical Medicine presents the application of basic biomedical science principles to the practice of modern osteopathic medicine as students end their pre-clinical training and transition to the core clinical rotations in the third year of training. This course introduces the student to the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with common problems encountered in the practice of Internal Medicine, Surgery, Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Psychiatry. Students will continue training in the approach to the patient, writing orders, performing a problem-focused history and physical, and providing transitions in care.

5 credits  

Lecture

DO 251M  — Introduction to Clinical Medicine  

The Introduction to Clinical Medicine presents the application of basic biomedical science principles to the practice of modern osteopathic medicine as students end their pre-clinical training and transition to the core clinical rotations in the third year of training. This course introduces the student to the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with common problems encountered in the practice of Internal Medicine, Surgery, Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Psychiatry. Students will continue training in the approach to the patient, writing orders, performing a problem-focused history and physical, and providing transitions in care.

5 credits  

Lecture

DO 309  — Introduction to Clerkship  
17 credits  
DO 309G  — Introduction to Clerkship  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 309M  — Introduction to Clerkship  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 310  — Family Medicine Rotation  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 310G  — Family Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 310M  — Family Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 312  — OMM Family Medicine  

Required four-week hospital based clinical rotation in PCOM affiliated hospitals.

.02-17 credits  

On Line

DO 312A  — OMM Family Medicine Selective  
.02-17 credits  
DO 312B  — OMM/Family Medicine CC Away  
0 credits  
DO 312C  — Fam Med Presentation OSCE  
0 credits  

On Line

DO 312G  — OMM Family Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 312M  — OMM Family Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 313  — General Internal Medicine Rotaton  

Required four-week clinical rotation in PCOM affiliated hospitals and outpatient offices.

8.5, 17 credits  

On Line

DO 313G  — Internal Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 313M  — General Internal Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 314  — Clinical Cardiology Rotation  

Required four-week clinical rotation in PCOM affiliated hospitals and outpatient offices.

0-17 credits  

On Line

DO 314G  — IM Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 314M  — IM Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 315  — OB and GYN Clinical Rotation  

Required four-week elective rotation in PCOM affiliated hospital and outpatient offices.

8.5-25.5 credits  

On Line

DO 315G  — Obstetrics Gynecology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 315M  — Obstetrics Gynecology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 316  — Pediatric Rotation  

Required four-week elective rotation in PCOM affiliated hospital and outpatient offices.

8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 316G  — Pediatrics  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 316M  — Pediatrics  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 317  — Psychiatry Rotation  

Required four-week clinical rotation in PCOM affiliated hospitals and outpatient offices.

8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 317G  — Psychiatry  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 317M  — Psychiatry  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 319  — General Surgery Rotation  

Required 4-week clinical rotation in PCOM affiliated hospital and outpatient offices.

8.5, 17 credits  

On Line

DO 319G  — General Surgery  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 319M  — General Surgery  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 320  — Surgery Rotation  
8.5, 17 credits  

On Line

DO 320G  — Surgery Subspecialty  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 320M  — Surgery Subspecialty  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321  — IM Subspecialty  
8.5, 17 credits  

On Line

DO 321A  — IM Allergy Immunology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321AG  — IM Allergy Immunology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321AM  — IM Allergy Immunology  

On Line

DO 321B  — IM Neurology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321BG  — IM Neurology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321BM  — IM Neurology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321C  — IM Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321CG  — IM Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321CM  — IM Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321D  — IM Dermatology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321DG  — IM Dermatology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321DM  — IM Dermatology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321E  — IM Geriatric Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321EG  — IM Geriatric Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321EM  — IM Geriatric Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321F  — IM Neonatal ICU  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321FG  — IM Neonatal ICU  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321FM  — IM Neonatal ICU  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321G  — IM Subspecialty  
4.25-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321H  — IM Hematology Oncology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321HG  — IM Hematology Oncology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321HM  — IM Hematology Oncology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321I  — IM Infectious Disease  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321IG  — IM Infectious Process  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321IM  — IM Infectious Disease  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321J  — IM Critical Care  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321JG  — IM Critical Care  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321JM  — IM Critical Care  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321K  — IM Pediatric ICU  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321KG  — IM Pediatric ICU  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321KM  — IM Pediatric ICU  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321L  — IM Palliative Care  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321LG  — IM Palliative Care  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321LM  — IM Palliative Care  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321M  — IM Subspecialty  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321N  — IM Nephrology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321NG  — IM Nephrology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321NM  — IM Nephrology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321O  — IM Rheumatology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321OG  — IM Rheumatology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321OM  — IM Rheumatology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321P  — IM Pediatrics  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321PG  — IM Pediatrics  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321PM  — IM Pediatrics  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321Q  — IM PM&R  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321QG  — IM PM and R  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321QM  — IM PM and R  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321R  — IM Radiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321RG  — IM Radiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321RM  — IM Radiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321S  — IM Pediatric Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321SG  — IM Pediatric Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321SM  — IM Pediatric Cardiology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321T  — IM Gastroenterology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321TG  — IM Gastroenterology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321TM  — IM Gastroenterology  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321U  — IM Pulmonary Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321UG  — IM Pulmonary Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321UM  — IM Pulmonary Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321V  — IM Pain Management  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321VG  — IM Pain Management  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321VM  — IM Pain Management  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321W  — IM Wound Care  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321WG  — IM Wound Care  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321WM  — IM Wound Care  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 321X  — IM Endocrine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321XG  — IM Endocrine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 321XM  — IM Endocrine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 322  — Advanced Clinical Skills Radiology  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 322A  — Advanced Clinical Skills  
4.25 credits  
DO 322G  — Advanced Clinical Skills  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 322M  — I2C  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 323G  — Emergency Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 324  — Emergency Medicine Sect III  
0 credits  
DO 325  — Palliative Medicine  
0-8.5 credits  
DO 326  — Medical Humanities  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 326G  — Medical Humanities  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 384  — Women Health and Pediatrics  
0-51 credits  
DO 385  — Adult Medicine  
0-51 credits  
DO 386  — Surgery  
0-51 credits  
DO 387  — CRIBS III  
3-17 credits  
DO 387G  — CRIBS III  
3-17 credits  

Lecture

DO 387M  — CRIBS III  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 389  — Elective Medical Spanish  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 389G  — Elective Medical Spanish  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 389M  — Elective Medical Spanish  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 391  — CRIBS IV  
8.5, 17 credits  
DO 391G  — CRIBS IV  
8.5, 17 credits  
DO 391M  — CRIBS IV  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 391R  — Research  
3 credits  
DO 392  — Elective Clerkship  
.02-17 credits  
DO 392G  — Elective Clerkship  
.02-17 credits  
DO 392GR  — Research  
3-6 credits  
DO 392M  — Elective  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 392R  — Elective Research  
3-17 credits  
DO 394  — Elective Rotation  

Four-week elective rotation in PCOM affiliated hospital or outpatient office.

DO 400G  — Interprof DO  
0 credits  
DO 411G  — Rural Underserved Medicine  
4.25-17 credits  

On Line

DO 412  — Ambulatory Sub I Rotation  
0-17 credits  

On Line

DO 412G  — Rural Underserv Osteop Sub I  
4.25-17 credits  

On Line

DO 412M  — Rural Underserv Osteop Sub I  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 413  — Ambulatory Sub II Rotation  
0-17 credits  

On Line

DO 413G  — Rural Underserv Amb Sub I  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 413M  — Rural Underserv Amb Sub I  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 415  — Emergency Medicine Rotation  
8.5, 17 credits  

On Line

DO 415M  — Emergency Medicine  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 416  — Medical Sub I Rotation  
8.5, 17 credits  
DO 419  — Surgery Selective  
DO 420G  — Surgery Sub/Selective  
8.5, 17 credits  
DO 421G  — IM Sub/Selective  
8.5, 17 credits  
DO 422  — Ambulatory Surgery  
8.5-17 credits  
DO 422G  — Internal Medicine Ambulatory  
8.5, 17 credits  

On Line

DO 422M  — IM Ambulatory  
8.5-17 credits  

On Line

DO 480  — Research Fellowship  
1-17 credits  
DO 481  — Research  
1-17 credits  
DO 481G  — OMM Fellow Georgia  
17 credits  
DO 489  — Vacation  
0 credits  
DO 990  — Lehigh Valley Clerkship  
0-17 credits  
DO 997  — Winter Break  
DO 997G  — Winter Break  
0 credits  
DO 997M  — Winter Break  
0, 0 credits  
DO 999G  — Schedule Off Clerkship  
.02-17 credits  
DO 999M  — Scheduled Off