Clinical Psychology (CPSY)

CPSY 102  — Doctoral Writing Skills Seminar  

(Part 1) This course is designed to provide structure for scientific and doctoral-level writing. These writing skills are deemed critical to successful communication in the PsyD program and the field of professional psychology.

0 credits  
CPSY 103  — Doctoral Writing Skills Seminar  

(Part 2) This course is designed to provide structure for scientific and doctoral-level writing. These writing skills are deemed critical to successful communication in the PsyD program and the field of professional psychology.

0 credits  
CPSY 104  — Doctoral Writing Skills Seminar  

(Part 3) This course is designed to provide structure for scientific and doctoral-level writing. These writing skills are deemed critical to successful communication in the PsyD program and the field of professional psychology.

0 credits  
CPSY 600  — Independent Study  

This course is designed to provide an overview of theories of learning and critical concepts and constructs related to human learning. Consideration is given to basic principles and laws of learning and how they apply to understanding and predicting human behavior. Clinical applications of learning theory and research are reviewed.

1-3 credits  
CPSY 601  — Learning Theories  

This course is designed to provide an overview of theories of learning and critical concepts and constructs related to human learning. Consideration is given to basic principles and laws of learning and how they apply to understanding and predicting human behavior. Clinical applications of learning theory and research are reviewed.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 603  — Behavioral Medicine  

This course is designed to provide an overview of essential content for the preparation of clinical psychologists practicing in primary care and other related medical settings. Particular emphasis is placed upon the clinical psychologist as a practitioner, consultant, teacher, researcher, administrator and role model in the medical setting.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 605  — History and Systems  

This course is designed as an overview of the history of psychology in the Western world. The historical approaches to this task will include a historical developmental approach to origins and changes of ideas over time, the study of great persons and schools of thought, and a look at the Zeitgeist of each.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 607  — Cognitive Affective Bases of Behavioral Intervention  

This course emphasizes theoretical, conceptual, empirical and clinical issues to better understand the cognitive-affective-behavioral interaction. Areas of concern will include modes of thinking, sensation and visual and other sensory perception, motivation, emotion, concept formation, construction of reality and the self.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 608  — Social Psychology  

This course is designed to help the student understand basic principles and concepts of psychology related to the behavior of individuals in social contexts. Special emphasis is placed upon the social-clinical psychology interface and the role of the clinical psychologist as an applied social psychologist.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 616  — Lifespan Development  

This course offers a multifaceted approach to learning about human development. It provides both an empirical and theoretical examination of human development across the lifespan. It is the intention of this course to acquaint the student with essential concepts and models of development. Psychological principles and historical and recent research in the areas of prenatal, cognitive, language, socio-emotional and physical development will be explored, and cultural considerations will be incorporated. Overall, this course is aimed at providing a comprehensive, clinically oriented overview of lifespan development. Note: CPSY 616 and CPSY 620 replace former program requirements CPSY 611 and CPSY 613.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 620  — Psychopathology  

The goal of this course will be to familiarize students with the current diagnostic nosology as well as prominent features associated with psychological disorders. Note: CPSY 616 and CPSY 620 replace former program requirements CPSY 611 and CPSY 613.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 622  — Ethics in Psychology  

This course familiarizes the student with the APA Code of Ethics, the Pennsylvania Licensing Law for Psychologists and the Specialty Guidelines for the Delivery of Services. It will also discuss the difference between legal and ethical issues and a variety of professional issues.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 623  — Human Diversity: Multiculturalism and Individual Differences  

The intent of this course is to present an overview of issues and methods that will serve as a guide to developing multicultural competence, i.e., the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to understand, communicate with and treat a culturally diverse patient population.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 624  — Research I: Research Design and Methodology  

Course objectives are to understand the basic research designs in clinical psychology and the methodological issues in formulating, planning, designing, implementing, analyzing and interpreting the results of research investigations. Prerequisite: Undergraduate or graduate statistics course.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 625  — Research II: Univariate and Multivariate + Lab  

This course has three major goals. The first goal is to teach doctoral students fundamental and advanced theory principles and essential concepts in measurement applied to psychological phenomena (commonly referred to as Test Theory or Psychological Measurement). The second major goal is to teach doctoral students fundamental and advanced principles and essential concepts in planning, selecting, conducting, and interpreting statistical analyses of empirical research studies in clinical psychology. The third major goal is to help students develop basic proficiency in the use of SPSS as a tool for analyzing data sets.

4 credits  

Prerequisites: PSY 624 or CPSY 624

Lecture

CPSY 626  — Assessment I: Assessing Cognitive Ability  

This course identifies the relevant issues/criticisms related to intelligence and intelligence testing. Students will be able to administer, score and interpret the most current edition of the WISC and WAIS, analyze data and organize it in a meaningful way to communicate to the client and prepare complete comprehensive written reports.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 627  — Assessment II: Objective Personality + Lab  

This course covers the definition, identification and assessment of a variety of personality functions through the use of objective assessment instruments. Prerequisite: CPSY 626 completed with a grade of B- or better.

3 credits  

Prerequisites: PSY 626 or CPSY 626

Lecture

CPSY 628  — Assessment III: Projective Assessment  

This course covers the definition, identification and assessment of a variety of personality functions through the use of projective assessment instruments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Rorschach and Thematic Apperception Test (TAT). Prerequisites: CPSY 626 and CPSY 627 completed with a grade of B- or better.

3 credits  

Prerequisites: (PSY 626 or CPSY 626), (PSY 627 or CPSY 627)

Lecture

CPSY 629  — Physiological Basis Behavior  

This course introduces the student to the structures and functions of the brain and central nervous system. In addition, the interrelationship between biochemical, physiological and neurological influences on human behavior will be explored.

1, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 630  — Cognitive Therapy  

The two primary goals of this course are to introduce the student to the history, philosophy and conceptual model of cognitive therapy and to address the practice issues revolving around models of treatment, standards of care and the importance of empirically validated treatment.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 630E  — LGBT: Cultural Competency Therapy  

This course provides an informative and useful introduction to understanding and working more effectively with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender clients. A CBT lens will be applied to understand the developmental and ongoing experiences of LGBT people, how these can affect their psychological functioning, and what issues to be most aware of when treating them. Students will become more aware of some of the stressors that can affect the psychological vulnerability of LGBT persons, and identify ways to speak and relate to these clients to facilitate greater honesty and openness. The course will clarify characteristics of good and bad psychotherapeutic practice in working with these clients.

1, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 634  — Pediatric Psychology  

This course provides students with an overview of the relationship between children’s physical health and their mental health, academic functioning and socio-emotional wellbeing. A systems approach emphasizes strategies to collaborate with the family, school and health care system. Prevention and wellness promotion programming are discussed. Culturally responsive assessment and intervention strategies to address chronic medical conditions are taught. Legal issues, ethical practice and professional development pertaining to children with health-related issues are also emphasized.

1, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 643  — Therapy with Couples  

This course focuses on the treatment of dyadic relationships. Various theoretical and technical models of couple-based therapy will be discussed and demonstrated. Prerequisites: CPSY 602, CPSY 603, and CPSY 630.

1-3 credits  

Prerequisites: (PSY 602 or CPSY 602), (PSY 603 or CPSY 603), (PSY 611 or CPSY 611), (PSY 613 or CPSY 613), (PSY 630 or CPSY 630), (PSY 614 or CPSY 614)

Lecture

CPSY 650  — Psychopharmacology  

The psychologist working with the physician must be knowledgeable about the main effects, side effects and synergistic effects of both psychopharmacologically specific and other medically prescribed drugs. This course introduces the student to the rationale and choices of drugs used in medical practice. Prerequisite: CPSY 607.

1, 3 credits  

Prerequisites: PSY 607 or CPSY 607

Lecture

CPSY 652  — Practicum I  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at a practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course material includes teaching, modeling and practice with a work sample demonstrating a manually informed, empirically supported approach to treatment, identifying factors in patients’ readiness to change, describing how to form a working therapeutic alliance with diverse clients and populations, and applying motivational interviewing techniques in order to maximize treatment participation. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversity issues.

1.5-2 credits  
CPSY 653  — Practicum II  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/ psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist.. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course material includes teaching, modeling and practice with work samples demonstrating skills for forming a working alliance with clients with a variety of individual and culturally diverse characteristics; describing the components of Persons’s model of cognitive case conceptualization and practicing the application of the Persons’s model to cases seen on practicum, practicing selected cognitive therapy techniques, and critically evaluating a faculty STEPPS video in terms of case formulation, intervention strategies, and social context factors including issues of power and privilege. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversityissues. Prerequisite: CPSY 652.

1.5-2 credits  
CPSY 654  — Practicum III  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course material builds upon skills learned in Practicum I and II, and includes describing and practicing the application of the functional analytic model of case conceptualization and treatment planning, practice applying selected behavioral techniques and providing a strategic rationale for using each technique, and using the Psychotherapy Skills Inventory in evaluating psychotherapy sessions as a form of self- evaluation and peer consultation of psychotherapy skill. Prerequisites: CPSY 652 and CPSY 653.

1.5 credits  
CPSY 655  — Practicum IV  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist.. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course material builds upon skills learned in Practicum I, II and III, and includes describing principles of collaborative assessment and integrative psychological test report writing, strategies for integrating psychological test data that tap different dimensions of cognitive processing, affective functioning, and personality functioning into a coherent description of the whole person, and proving jargon-free strategies for providing feedback of standard psychological test and assessment results to diverse individuals and groups that accounts for health literacy and enhances treatment adherence. Students view a video of a faculty providing assessment feedback and provide critical feedback. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversity issues. Prerequisites: CPSY 652, CPSY 653 and CPSY 654.

0-2 credits  
CPSY 661  — Administration, Consultation and Supervision: Behavioral Health  

This course is designed to provide students with the skills for conducting clinical supervision, mental health consultation, and the management of mental health services associated with a variety of administrative and clinical supervisory positions. Prerequisites: CPSY 652 and CPSY 653.

3 credits  

Prerequisites: (PSY 652 or CPSY 652), (PSY 653 or CPSY 653)

Lecture

CPSY 662  — Behavior Therapy  

This course is designed to introduce students to the philosophy and practice of behavior therapy. A major goal of this course is to help students effectively utilize basic behavioral techniques. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how learning principles inform the application of these techniques and the importance of implementing these techniques within the context of a carefully considered behavioral case conceptualization. Students will gain experience in a functional behavioral assessment and numerous behavioral intervention strategies (e.g., contingency management, relaxation training, systematic desensitization, exposure, response prevention). Prerequisite: CPSY 601 with a grade of B- or better.

1, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 666  — Evidence-Based Treatment of OCD PTSD Anxiety  

Students will learn fundamental concepts and skills related to assessment and treatment of anxiety-related disorders, including OCD, PTSD, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. CBT-informed assessments of these disorders will be a focus of this course. Manualized cognitive and behavioral treatments, with an emphasis on exposure-based therapies, will be covered. Prerequisites: CPSY 630 and CPSY 662.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 667  — Internship  

PsyD students must register for each academic term in which the internship is served.

0-1 credits  
CPSY 670  — Problem Solving Therapy for Medical Patients  

This course is designed to provide an in-depth survey of problem-solving therapy and its applications. The course focuses on training students to conduct this empirically supported, manually driven approach, and also teaches students to adopt a problem solving approach to clinical decision-making. Emphasis is on problem-solving therapy for persons with medical conditions such ascancer, irritable bowel syndrome and multiple sclerosis; discussion and examples of problem- solving therapy’s application to treatment of anxiety and depression are also highlighted. Prerequisites: CPSY 603, CPSY 630 and CPSY 662.

1, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 674  — Research III: Dissertation Development Seminar  

This course teaches students the step-by-step processes involved in the dissertation process from beginning to end. Students develop a research question, secure a dissertation chair, and compile an extensive bibliography related to their doctoral dissertation research project. Prerequisites: CPSY 624 and CPSY 625 completed with a grade of B- or better; successful completion of Essay and Objective Comprehensive Exams.

0-3 credits  
CPSY 674A  — Research IV: Method Development and Strategic Planning  

Students develop an extensive, detailed outline of their literature review. Following this, students develop the methodology for completing their dissertation research project. Issues such as selection of an appropriate design model and subject recruitment and assignment are covered. Finally, students begin the process of completing the literature review based on their outline and bibliography.

1.5, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 674B  — Research V: Manuscript Development and Defense Planning  

During this course, students select the proper data analytic models, complete their dissertation proposals, secure all three members of their dissertation committee, and schedule. Finally, they conduct a practice run of the defense of their dissertation proposals which includes an oral presentation of their research project in a PowerPoint presentation.

1.5-3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 675  — Dissertation Advisement  

After students have completed Research V, they continue to work on the completion of their doctoral thesis and meet with dissertation committee members and work on their own to complete all the steps through final approval. Students register for this course each and every term in which they are enrolled until they have successfully defended their final dissertation thesis. Prerequisites: CPSY 674, CPSY 674A and CPSY 674B.

1-3 credits  
CPSY 678  — Assessment and Treat of Addictive Behavior  

This course provides an overview of the epidemiology, etiology, and assessment and treatment of addictive behaviors, including substance abuse, gambling and excessive sexual behavior. The focus is on research-based understanding of addictive behaviors and on current theoretical and technical knowledge and controversy in the field. Prerequisites: CPSY 630 and CPSY 662.

1, 3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 681  — Essay Comprehensive Exam  

Students register for this portion of the comprehensive exam during the first term in which the exam is offered upon students’ eligibility.

0-1 credits  
CPSY 682  — Objective Comprehensive Exam  

Students register for this portion of the comprehensive exam during the first term in which the exam is offered upon students’ eligibility.

0-1 credits  
CPSY 687E  — Cognitive Habilitation and Rehabilitation  
3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 688  — Integrative Health Care  

This course expands upon principles learned in earlier foundation courses through case based learning. Students approach clinical case discussions in mixed-discipline student groups including Physician Assistant Studies, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, School Psychology, Mental Health Counseling, and Organizational Developmental Leadership Program students that will be facilitated by a clinical psychologist, physician assistants, and physicians, among other guestprofessionals. The purpose of the course is to further develop an appreciation and understanding for collaborative and integrative health care. Prerequisite: CPSY 603.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 695E  — Professional Development Seminar  

Each term of a 1 credit Professional Development Seminar is designed to expose students to focused topics relating to competencies of clinical psychologists that will prepare them to function in a multitude of practice settings. Topics may include leadership, diversity and individual differences as pertaining to current concerns in psychology, interprofessional collaboration and integrated health care, leading health and psychosocial problems, advocacy, trends in evidence- based practice, business practices in psychology, self-care, and others.

1 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 696E  — Traumatic Degenerative Brain Disorder  

This course offers a survey of clinical research as it relates to behavioral recovery following damage in the central nervous system. Recent theories and literature are stressed. Case studies and direct application to clinical work will be emphasized.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 698A  — STEPPS Comprehensive Exam A  
0 credits  
CPSY 698B  — STEPPS Comprehensive Exam B  
0 credits  
CPSY 698C  — STEPPS Comprehensive Exam C  
0 credits  
CPSY 703  — Clinical Research Practicum  

The Clinical Research Practicum is designed to instruct students in the process of research development, data collection, data management and analysis, and data reporting of applied clinical research designed and led by core faculty. Students will often have opportunity and responsibility for direct client/patient contact, learning about empirically supported treatments or development of empirical testing of treatments, grant submission, and administering and scoring clinical measures that can be used for research and practice. Student participation and advisement/instruction may be individual or in groups.

1-3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 710  — Practicum V  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course material builds upon skills learned in Practicum I, II, III, and IV, and includes practice with applying selected standard behavioral and cognitive techniques designed to defuse resistance and improve motivation for change, and the rationale for using each technique; discussing the theoretical bases for understanding therapeutic resistance, and a variety of perspectives and methods for improving treatment participation and successful outcomes; and describing the Nezu and Nezu Problem Solving Model for formulating case conceptualizations and applying it to cases seen on practicum. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversity issues. Prerequisites: CPSY 652, CPSY 653, CPSY 654, and CPSY 655.

1.5-2 credits  
CPSY 711  — Practicum VI  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course materials build upon Practicum I through V, and includes being able to describe and apply Needleman’s cognitive case conceptualization model to cases seen on practicum; describing the salient features of Recovery-oriented clinical supervision; and practice applying a cognitive behavioral model of supervision with a junior colleague or trainee by making effective use of agenda-setting, formative feedback, and case conceptualization, while encouraging self-reflection and discovery. Crisis management will also be addressed, and an interprofessional educational experience simulation will enrich the learning. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversity issues. Prerequisites: CPSY 652, CPSY 653, CPSY 654, CPSY 655, and CPSY 710.

1.5, 2 credits  
CPSY 712  — Practicum VII  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar at PCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist. Additional elective practicum hours are an option. Course material builds upon skills learned in Practicum I through VI and includes describing the roles and methods of consultation and education in seeking resolution of problems within the medical, psychological and social contexts, describing a cognitive-behavioral model of patient-centered case consultation, and relevant concepts and theories of consultation and education based upon the scientific literature, including foundational knowledge of systemic conceptualizations while taking into account taking into contextual and diversity variables; engaging in a collaborative consultative relationship with others within psychology and other disciplines; and conducting an inservice on a clinical topic of interest to staff at the practicum site, including a PowerPoint of an in-service training session led by the student, with evaluations from participants. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversity issues. Prerequisites: CPSY 652, CPSY 653, CPSY 654, CPSY 655, CPSY 710, and CPSY 711.

1.5 credits  
CPSY 713  — Practicum VIII  

Minimum of 24 hours/week at practicum site (most students complete 24-32 hours a week) and a weekly seminar a tPCOM performing the basics of evaluation, psychological assessment, psychotherapy, consultation, evidence-based intervention/psychotherapy and other work appropriate to the role of a beginning psychologist.. Additional elective practicum hours are an option and includes explaining the legal and ethical considerations in handling special situations (e.g., homicidality, suicidality, abuse, neglect, ethical challenges), and the need for supervision in handling them; analyzing and discussing one’s responses to therapeutic interventions or ethical dilemmas in a variety of settings, with supervision; developing a plan addressing the need for self-care in professional practice, and a commitment to maintaining a regular program of self-care as part of life-long learning; developing a personal self-care plan with components that involve regular practice and anticipate and plan for how to overcome potential barriers to regular practice; and discussing the development of a commitment to understanding and incorporating Individual and Cultural Diversity into personal ethical values and into ethical principles in all professional activities. Students are expected to serve as peer consultants during weekly case discussions with a focus upon diversity issues. Prerequisites: CPSY 652, CPSY 653, CPSY 654, CPSY 655, CPSY 710, CPSY 711, and CPSY 712.

1.5 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 731  — Leadership Ethics across Continuing Care  

This course is designed to engage the student in the investigation of the principles of ethics and their implementation is addressing decision-making and management of challenging issues.

1 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 788  — Integrative Behavioral Health Seminar  

The Integrative Behavioral Health Seminar is a clinical seminar focused on increasing knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to clinical psychologists taking an interprofessional approach to patient care. This course reinforces the IPEC principles introduced in Behavioral Medicine and reinforced in Integrative Behavioral Healthcare. The emphasis in this higher-level course is on the integration of scientific knowledge from core courses (i.e., physiological bases of behavior, cognitive, social, or developmental psychology) as they contribute to the development and maintenance of common clinical problems, such as suicidal ideation/behavior, sleep disorders, substance use/misuse, maladaptive eating behaviors, pain, and trauma. Social determinants of health and health literacy are key social components to the assessment and treatment of these conditions. Given the prevalence of the clinical symptoms presenting in primary care and other medical settings, interprofessional educational case discussions, simulations, and role-plays will be incorporated.

1 credits  
CPSY 795  — Dissertation Editing  
1 credits  
CPSY 799  — Independent Study  
.5-3 credits  
CPSY 861  — Clinical Foundation of Neuropsychology  

This course introduces the current state of the field and well-recognized and commonly used approaches in the clinical understanding of the human brain in behavior relationships.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 862  — Advanced Ethics, Healthcare Policy and Multidisciplinary Settings  

This course focuses on the application of the APA Code of Ethics, the Pennsylvania Licensing Law for Psychologists and the Specialty Guidelines for the Delivery of Services to delivery in multidisciplinary health care settings and in care of medical patients. The difference between legal and ethical issues and a variety of professional issues will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on ethical decision making often encountered in working with clinical health and neuropsychology/rehabilitation populations.

3 credits  

Lecture

CPSY 863  — Behavior and Healthcare Psychological Assessment  

This advanced course familiarizes students with diagnostic techniques and clinical assessment tools and skills necessary for practice in various medical, surgical, and multidisciplinary health care settings. Measures used for clinical practice and research investigations will be covered. Students will be guided to adopt appropriate clinical decision-making skills for selection of assessment approaches, and will gain practice in the use of appropriate instruments in these settings. Students are required to have had clinical psychology assessment courses prior to enrolling in this course.

3 credits  

Lecture