School Psychology (SPSY)

SPSY 501  — Professional School Psychology  

This course introduces students to school psychology as a profession, from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Alternative roles and functions associated with the practice of school psychology are reviewed, with emphasis on contemporary issues associated with graduate preparation, credentialing, and service delivery. Legal and ethical issues for school psychology are addressed extensively as well. Class discussions address the domains of practice identified in the NASP Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (National Association of School Psychologists, 2010). In addition, attention is given to historical trends and considerations for the future of the profession.

2, 3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 504  — Developmental Psychology  

This course explores child development from conception through early adulthood, including growth, adaptation and developmental patterns with implications for academic, emotional and social learning. Also, there is a special emphasis on research concerning the development of pro-social behavior, internalization, and gender and moral development as well as the influence of culture and socioeconomic status.

1-3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 506  — Physiology  

This course is designed to introduce the students to structures and functions of the brain and central nervous system and the influences on human behavior and learning. In addition to understanding the functions of the brain, emphasis is also given to exploring how different cultural elements impact advances in physiology, health, and psychology. Neurodevelopmental disabilities, assessment and intervention with children and youth at home and school are among the topics covered.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 507  — Exceptional Child  

This course is designed to provide a basic knowledge base about development that allows the student to understand atypical and cultural influences on development. In doing so, the student will be introduced to a wide variety of developmental disabilities and become sensitized to the implications of these disabilities when working with children and their families. In addition, the student will cover a wide range of developmental disabilities, including learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities, pervasive development disabilities, sensory disabilities, communication impairments and traumatic brain injuries. The course will use lectures, discussions, videotapes, student presentations and guest speakers to provide a comprehensive learning experience.

2, 3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 508  — Foundations of Psychotherapy  

The major theoretical approaches to psychotherapy and counseling with children and adolescents will be reviewed, with special consideration of developmental, social, personal and cultural factors and the applications of techniques in school settings. The course is designed to provide an introduction to the basic skills used in psychotherapy and counseling in general and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) specifically. Students learn how to deal with social and emotional problems frequently encountered in school age children. Research focusing on treatment outcome as well as case material will be reviewed. Ethical and cultural considerations in the psychotherapeutic treatment of children will also be discussed. Prerequisite: SPSY 504

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 512  — Psychometrics  

Tests and Measurements is a course dealing with basic concepts in the selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of educational, behavioral and psychological tests commonly used in the field of school psychology and behavior analysis. Psychometric concepts such as validity and reliability will be examined, as will methods for evaluating the quality and technical adequacy of testing instruments. Students will increase their understanding of tests designed for assessing cognitive, behavioral, neuropsychological, academic and social- emotional functioning. Procedures for interpreting and communicating test results will be introduced, and issues related to the social, cultural, legal and ethical aspects of assessment will be explored. Lectures, class discussions, student presentations and readings will be used. Student performance will be evaluated through multiple methods.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 524  — Basic Principles in Applied Behavioral Analysis  

This course is an introductory course that provides an overview of the basic principles in applied behavior analysis and their application in the educational/clinical setting. Students will be provided with an overview of the essential characteristics of applied behavior analysis as well as the principles, processes and concepts. This course will also provide an overview of measurement concepts as well as the philosophical and theoretical orientation of applied behavior analysis.

3 credits  

Lecture, On Line

SPSY 525  — Behavioral Change and System Supports  

This course provides an overview of behavioral assessment, behavior change procedures, generalization programming and systems supports. Students will be expected to conduct a variety of behavior change procedures, as well as demonstrate an understanding of system concerns and system change procedures in the educational setting. Prerequisite SPSY 524

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 526  — Single Case Experimental Design  

This course follows from the Introduction to Research Design and Data Analysis course, with an emphasis on multicultural research topics. The course provides students with an opportunity to apply previously learned research skills in developing an idea for a multicultural research project and writing a formal research paper according to APA requirements. Prerequisite SPSY 524

1-3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 527  

This course will provide training in the ethical application of psychological, educational and behavioral theory and foundations of practice for children in school settings. BACB, NASP, and APA ethical practice, guidelines and standards are discussed as applied to best professional practice. Relevant legal and professional practice standards will be addressed relevant to school psychology and behavior analysis. Relevant issues in supervision in applied behavior analysis will also bediscussed.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 528  — Behavior Assessment  

This course will provide students with an overview of behavior assessment procedures to determine appropriate educational and behavioral programming. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize a variety of assessment strategies to assist with supporting students and developing interventions in applied settings.

3 credits  

On Line

SPSY 531  — Theories of Learning and Behavior  

This course provides an overview of learning and behavior, as well as the philosophical underpinnings of behavior and applied behavior analysis. Emphasis will be placed on behavioral learning theory and the philosophical assumptions underlying learning theory and the science of behavior analysis. Topics related to learning and behavior such as reinforcement, punishment, operant and respondent learning, evolutionary perspectives, translational research and language development will be reviewed.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 535  — Clinical Supervision, Management Training  

This course will provide an overview of an applied behavior analytic approach to personnel supervision, management, and training. Emphasis will be placed on behavior assessment of personnel performance and the use of empirically-derived interventions for improving personnel performance. Additionally, students will be introduced to the application of behavior measurement and evaluation strategies to determine the effectiveness of personnel performance interventions. Students will also be introduced to training strategies that establish and maintain the professional repertoire of behavior analyst trainees.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 551  — Practicum: Functional Behavioral Assessment  

This seminar will provide advanced training in the application of behavioral, psychological and educational theory and foundations of practice for children in school settings. The dual focus of the practicum experience at the MS level is on orientation to school settings, particularly with regard to working with multidisciplinary teams, and on functional behavioral assessment. This experience provides an integration of the coursework and the clinical/field experience gained in the program. In addition, there will be supervision, discussion of relevant issues and literature reviews during class sessions. APA, NASP and BACB ethical practice and guidelines and standards are discussed as applied to best practice. Primarily classroom discussion and some lectures will be used. Students will bring case reviews and general experiences to class for discussion. In addition, students will be required to keep a portfolio to document experiences and learning throughout practicum as well as complete a functional behavior assessment.

1, 2 credits  
SPSY 590  — Independent Study  
3 credits  
SPSY 598  — MS Comprehensive Exam  
0 credits  
SPSY 609  — Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Schools  

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the provisions of school-based mental health services from a cognitive behavioral perspective. The course begins with an introduction to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) including its history and basic theoretical tenets. The structure of the class will then build upon theory to a model progressing from assessment and case conceptualization to intervention selection and implementation. The issues revolving around the standards of treatment and quality of care will be addressed. Students will further learn specific techniques and interventions for a variety of child and adolescent issues presented in school settings, such as school refusal, aggressive behavior, student underachievement, ADHD, anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Developmental, multicultural and ethical considerations will be reviewed and discussed. Skills will be developed through case conceptualizations and case discussions as well as role play scenarios.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 611  — Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Educational Leaders  

The purpose of this course is to analyze the relationship between curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Specifically, what is the impact that this relationship has on the educational achievement of students, and what is the school psychologist’s role in managing that relationship? Students will be introduced to the principles of curriculum evaluation and adaptation, effective instruction, and the use of assessment data to make informed instructional and curricular changes to improve student achievement. The ultimate goal is that participants develop the skills necessary to become assessment and instructional leaders within the schools. Students will develop leadership skills by becoming familiar with legal issues that drive educational practices on the state and national level. They will be introduced to resources available through the state and federal governments as well as through professional organizations. Methods include readings, audio and video presentations, lectures, cooperative learning groups, and discussions. Students will be required to produce written products, give presentations, complete a professional project and take a written exam.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 613  — Assessment I: Cognitive Assessment  

This course addresses both theory and diagnosis of cognitive assessment and identifies the relevant issues/criticisms related to intelligence testing. Students acquire skills in the selection of a broad range of methods for assessing, administering, scoring, (including computer scoring), interpreting (including computer printouts), reporting and communicating results of evaluation data on children’s cognitive ability and functioning to answer educationally relevant questions. This occurs through developing skills in assessing, observing, interviewing and record and portfolio reviews. Assessment for intervention and outcome will be applied using traditional intelligence testing using Wechsler scales, WPPSI-III, WISC-IV, WAIS-III, Stanford-Binet V and Adaptive Behavior Measures. Through lectures, labs and practice cases, students gain technical skills with these instruments.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 614  — Multicultural Perspectives in Psychology  

The intent of this course is to present a detailed overview of the complex issues and methods that will serve as a guide to developing multicultural competence, i.e., understanding diversity from a historical, sociological, developmental, educational and psychological perspective. Students are introduced to significant aspects of other cultures while examining their own experiences and developing personal awareness and appropriately applying knowledge to skill- based practices in school settings in order to promote a positive impact on school achievement, self-esteem and personal growth of all children. In addition, students will learn to administer an array of non-verbal and culturally fair assessments and learn how these tests, in conjunction with traditional assessments, inform the practice of school psychology.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 615  — Assessment II: Academic Interventions  

This is the second course in the assessment sequence and is designed to introduce school psychology educational specialist graduate program students to individualized educational assessment practices and their links to educational interventions. The course will address the assessment of the educational needs of exceptional learners, with primary emphasis on the basic skill areas of reading, written expression and mathematics.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 616  — Educational Research, Program Planning and Evaluation  

This course prepares students to participate in program planning and evaluation activities, emphasizing both traditional and newly emerging approaches. The course examines how to plan, implement and evaluate school-based programs. Emphasis is placed on translating research into practice through implementation and evaluation of empirically supported programs and practices. Attention is given to monitoring student progress, at both individual and program levels. Course methods include readings, lectures, class discussions and completion of an applied project.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 617  — Academic and Behavioral Interventions  

Students focus on defining current problem areas, strengths and needs of school-age children using informal assessment measures such as observations, interviewing, work samples, curriculum-based assessment (CBA), DIBELS, and functional behavioral assessments (FBA). Additionally, students obtain knowledge of using these informal assessment measures as a means to assess progress ofevidence- based academic and behavioral interventions in order to determine a student’s response to intervention (RTI). Readings, lectures, class discussions, cooperative learning groups and labs are used as methods of instruction.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 618  — Assessment III: Behavioral, Social, and Emotional  

This is the final course in the assessment sequence, which focuses on the assessment of emotional, social, adaptive and behavioral issues of school-age children. Various formal and informal means of assessment are reviewed, including self-report measures, projective assessments, interview and functional behavioral assessment (FBA). Additionally, a cognitive-behavioral therapy model is offered for case conceptualization and treatment or intervention planning.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 619  — Consultation and Collaboration in Educational Settings  

This course provides an exploration of consultation theory and practice, including evaluating the efficacy of the interventions. Students achieve proficiency in implementing academic/mental health/behavioral consultation models (e.g., Conjoint Behavioral Consultation) and become familiar with other consultative models for providing services to individual clients. Indirect methods of intervention are explored through different approaches to consultative services for teachers, parents, administrators and other professionals to promote change at the levels of the individual students, classroom, building, district and/or other agency levels. School psychology students gain knowledge of the important features of collaborating effectively with others in planning and decision making. Also, emphasis is placed on teaching students effective communication skills, with an emphasis on understanding individuals of diverse backgrounds and characteristics. This course incorporates readings, lectures, class discussion and role-plays.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 620  — Prevention Strategies and Crisis Intervention  

Based on knowledge of current theory and research about the development of academic, behavioral and emotional issues in children, this course focuses on effective prevention strategies, as well as methods to develop, implement and evaluate programs that help prevent student difficulties at both home and school. This course also addresses crisis intervention ways to provide services in the aftermath of crisis. Readings, guest speakers and student presentations are used as methods.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 622  — Direct Assessment of Academic Skills  

The primary purpose of the course is to provide knowledge and application in the assessment of academic skills problems for professionals who serve as consultants to classroom teachers. Content of the course is oriented towards identifying and assessing the variables within the classroom environment that impact student academic performance; identifying deficit academic skills through curriculum based assessment; understanding the sequence of actions that accompany an assessment of academic skills problems; and understanding how curriculum based assessment may serve a potential role in addressing educational consultation with culturally and linguistically diverse populations. In addition, the course will further students understanding of how direct assessment of academic skills is utilized in Response to Intervention (RTI)/Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) and the implementation of RTI/MTSS as a methodology for addressing academic skills problems.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 623  — English Learners, Approaches and Supports  

This course explores strategies for supporting English Language Learners (ELLs) in formal and informal educational settings. Students are introduced to foundational theories and current research on social and academic factors that influence ELLs’ learning experiences. Emphasis is placed on instructional approaches to support teachers working with linguistically and culturally diverse English Language Learners.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 638P  — Practicum in Cognitive Therapy  
1-2 credits  
SPSY 641P  — Practicum in Neuropsychology in Schools  
1 credits  
SPSY 652  — Practicum in Applied Law and Ethics  
1, 2 credits  
SPSY 653  — Practicum: School-Wide Practice  

In conjunction with coursework, students complete a year-long practicum sequence in the schools during the second year of the EdS program. This field experience is focused on professional intervention practices, including assessment, consultation, counseling, informal assessment, and academic and behavioral interventions. The school-based practicum is accompanied by a seminar intended to provide students with additional supervision and didactic training. This Practicum Seminar focuses on school structure and organization, with emphasis on implementation of school- wide problem-solving models for identifying and addressing students’ academic and social/emotional/behavioral needs.

1 credits  
SPSY 654  — Practicum in Family School Partnerships  

In conjunction with coursework, students complete a year-long practicum sequence in the schools during the second year of the EdS program. This field experience is focused on professional intervention practices, including assessment, consultation, counseling, informal assessment, and academic and behavioral interventions. The school-based practicum is accompanied by a seminar intended to provide students with additional supervision and didactic training. Seminar discussions will include, but not be limited to,report writing, interventions and outcomes as well as ethical, legal and professional issues in the delivery of school psychological services. The focus of this Practicum Seminar is on establishing effective home-school relationships within the context of school psychological service delivery.

1, 2 credits  
SPSY 660  — Practicum Seminar  

This summer seminar course is optional. Only students accruing practicum hours during summer term should register. Students will be expected to communicate training goals and progress toward those goals for summer, and have individual consultations with the instructor. This seminar is intended to extend and support, rather than supplant, on-site supervision of practicum hours.

0 credits  
SPSY 661  — Internship Seminar I  

This year-long internship and bimonthly college-based seminar services as the culminating training experience for the specialist-level School Psychology certification program. It is a comprehensive experience through which the interns are required to integrate the knowledge base and applied skills of school psychology in promoting positive educational and mental health practices in resolving individual-, group- and system-level problems. The experience is designed to provide students with supervision and information on a variety of professional topics and issues. The course will provide students with a forum for sharing their field-based experiences and allow for case reviews of assessment, consultation and counseling in which the interns are professionally involved. Internship experiences, include advanced psycho-educational assessment and interpretation, with emphasis on intervention strategies and program planning, intensive case analysis and treatment planning, and exploration of ethical and legal dilemmas involved in the delivery of psychological services.

0-2 credits  
SPSY 662  — Internship Seminar II  

This year-long internship and bimonthly college-based seminar services as the culminating training experience for the specialist-level School Psychology certification program. It is a comprehensive experience through which the interns are required to integrate the knowledge base and applied skills of school psychology in promoting positive educational and mental health practices in resolving individual-, group- and system-level problems. The experience is designed to provide students with supervision and information on a variety of professional topics and issues. The course will provide students with a forum for sharing their field-based experiences and allow for case reviews of assessment, consultation and counseling in which the interns are professionally involved. Internship experiences, include advanced psycho-educational assessment and interpretation, with emphasis on intervention strategies and program planning, intensive case analysis and treatment planning, and exploration of ethical and legal dilemmas involved in the delivery of psychological services.

0-3 credits  
SPSY 663  — Internship Seminar III  

This year-long internship and bimonthly college-based seminar services as the culminating training experience for the specialist-level School Psychology certification program. It is a comprehensive experience through which the interns are required to integrate the knowledge base and applied skills of school psychology in promoting positive educational and mental health practices in resolving individual-, group- and system-level problems. The experience is designed to provide students with supervision and information on a variety of professional topics and issues. The course will provide students with a forum for sharing their field-based experiences and allow for case reviews of assessment, consultation and counseling in which the interns are professionally involved. Internship experiences, include advanced psycho-educational assessment and interpretation, with emphasis on intervention strategies and program planning, intensive case analysis and treatment planning, and exploration of ethical and legal dilemmas involved in the delivery of psychological services.

1 credits  
SPSY 664  — School-Based Practicum  

The 3-term (year-long) school-based practicum and corresponding practicum seminars for doctoral students provides the opportunity for students to gain exposure to, and experience in, all aspects of school-based practice of health service psychology. The overarching goal of the practicum experience is to develop and evaluate trainees’ ability to plan professional activities and to master skills in assessment, consultation, and school-based intervention consistent with the goals and objectives of the doctoral program. The practicum provides the opportunity to work in a school setting under the guidance of an experienced certified school psychologist who serves as a site supervisor. Expectations are year-long with assignments each term. Case presentations and group supervision during the university-based practicum seminar, led by a doctoral level licensed psychologist, will be a vital component to this process.

1 credits  
SPSY 699  — Externship: Independent Study  
.5 credits  
SPSY 700  — Introduction to Internship  

These seminars are for four semesters requiring additional hours at an internship site doing psychotherapy, consultation, intervention, evaluation, psychological assessment and other work appropriate to the role of a psychologist.

SPSY 725  — Cognitive Aspects of Behavior  

This course is part of a series that provides a broad and general education in health service psychology for practice in doctoral level school psychology. As part of the Discipline-Specific Knowledge curriculum, Cognitive Aspects of Behavior is designed to cover the cognitive underpinnings of behavior including cognitive learning theory, memory, thought processes and decision-making

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 732  — Child and Adolescent Psychopathology  

At the conclusion of this course, students will have an understanding of developmental considerations, risk and resilience factors, empirical research, and educational implications for the major psychological disorders relevant to children and adolescents. The roles of physical, motor, and cognitive growth, as well as social and affective behavior will be explored as it relates to abnormal psychological behavior. In addition, multicultural and socioeconomic factors will be discussed in relation to developmental issues. Students will be able to utilize the DSM-5 and its framework in addressing issues in child and adolescent psychopathology. Students will be familiar with relevant changes that have occurred between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 and the relationship between DSM and ICD classification systems. Active learning will occur through role playing, classroom activities, and group discussions.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 733  — History and Systems of Psychology  

This course is designed as an overview of the history of psychology in the Western world. The task will include a historical developmental approach to origins and changes of ideas over time, the study of great persons and schools of thought, and a look at the Zeitgeist of each. Students will examine the nature of psychology and school psychology as a whole, and the influences of philosophical worldviews in areas such as epistemology, ontology, teleology, and axiology. This course is structured to allow students to (re)evaluate their own assumptions and theoretical foundations.

2 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 735  — Linking Neuropsychology Assessment to Intervention  

This course is designed to help refine the assessment skills of psychologists who are familiar with the essentials of psychological and psychoeducational assessment with children, adolescents, and young adults, and to help establish the links betweenprevention efforts, effective assessment and effective interventions and intervention planning for students. Multicultural issues in prevention, assessment, and intervention will be discussed. Ethical considerations in prevention, assessment, and intervention practices also will be addressed.

3 credits  
SPSY 736  — CBT I  

The primary goal of this course is to introduce the student to the history, philosophy, and conceptual model of cognitive therapy. This is the first course in a three- course sequence.

1-3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 737  — CBT II: Treatment Strategies  

The primary goal of this course is to build upon the theories and techniques of the introductory course by addressing the practice issues around models of treatment for children in schools and mental health systems. It will include empirically validated treatment models using both modular treatment approaches and manual-based approaches. The use of CBT case conceptualization and treatment for various childhood disorders will be taught. This is the second course in a two-course sequence.

2 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 738  — CBT III: Applications  

This course is designed to integrate clinical application with theory. This practicum experience is provided in conjunction with SPSY 636 and SPSY 637. Skills will be developed through case conceptualization presentation and discussion of actual cases. This course provides an opportunity to complete a minimum of 50 hours of supervised practical experience in cognitive behavior therapy.

1, 2 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 740  — Instructional Design Delivery  

The purpose of the course is explore the relationship between curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Specifically, what is the impact that this relationship has on the educational achievement of students and what is the school psychologist’s role in managing that relationship. Students will be introduced to the principles of effective instruction, curriculum evaluation and adaptation.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 741  — Assessment IV Neuropsychology  

This course provides students with an overview of learning disorders from a neuropsychological perspective. Students examine the neuropsychological basis of childhood disorders for both identification and service delivery purposes. As the field of learning disorders is diverse, the course emphasizes criteria and content that have an established empirical base. Students will apply their knowledge of the causes and theoretical constructs of learning disorders through didactics, readings, group discussions and case study exercises. Knowledge of psychological assessment and brain structure and function is required.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 745  — Supervision  

This course addresses current topics related to the supervision of psychological services in schools and other settings. Theoretical approaches to supervision will be discussed, with emphasis on a cognitive-behavioral model. The primary focus of the course will be on supervision of services provided to children and adolescents.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 747  — Neuropathology  

This elective course provides an overview of genetic and acquired brain disorders. The course will provide students with an understanding of the biological bases of the disorders, how neurological and neuropsychological evaluation can help identify associated characteristics and how interdisciplinary teamwork can lead to optimal treatment outcomes for children with these conditions. Disorders include genetic disorders, birth injury, traumatic brain injury, seizure disorders, brain tumors, metabolic disorders, infectious disorders, and neurotoxic disorders. Frontal- subcortical circuit function and neuropsychopathology will also be addressed. Case studies will highlight the need for differential diagnosis and individualized intervention.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 748  — Biological Aspects of Behavior  

This first year course reviews the biological underpinnings of behaviors including neural, physiological, anatomical, and genetic and heritable aspects of behavior. This course will emphasize the study of neuroanatomy, the nervous system, the endocrine system, sensation and perception, evolutionary biology, the senses, movement, hunger, and sleep arousal rhythms.

1 credits  
SPSY 749  — Social Aspects of Behavior  

This graduate level course will introduce students to the theoretical perspectives, research methods, and empirical findings in contemporary social bases of behavior. Social psychology is the scientific study of how people’s thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors are affected by the real or imagined presence of others. More specifically, the course will cover group processes with the school environment, how personal attributions are created and/or sustained, and how discrimination is learned and supported throughout a culture. The major concepts discussed will help students think critically about social aspects and influences of behavior.

1, 2 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 751  — Affective Bases of Behavior  

This course reviews basic research related to the influence of affect, mood, and emotion on human behavior. Specific topics to be addressed include social learning theory, motivation, self-efficacy, social influence, resilience, and positive psychology.

1 credits  
SPSY 760  — Advanced Practicum Seminar  

This is the first of a 3-term advanced practicum and corresponding practicum seminars providing the opportunity for students to gain exposure to, and experience, in one or more of the following areas of health service psychology: assessment, consultation, intervention techniques. Moreover, students will have the opportunity to develop these skills with youth with more significant and/or specialized needs. Advanced practicum sites include a variety of youth-serving settings and roles in which the provision of psychological services occurs. This practicum may be school-based but also allows for experiences in non-school settings such as hospitals and clinics. Expectations are year-long with assignments each term. Case presentations and group supervision during the university-based practicum seminar, led by a doctoral level licensed psychologist, will be a vital component to this process.

1 credits  
SPSY 761  — Advanced Practicum Seminar II  

This is the second of a 3-term advanced practicum and corresponding practicum seminars providing the opportunity for students to gain exposure to, and experience, in one or more of the following areas of health service psychology: assessment, consultation, intervention techniques. Moreover, students will have the opportunity to develop these skills with youth with more significant and/or specialized needs. Advanced practicum sites include a variety of youth-serving settings and roles in which the provision of psychological services occurs. This practicum may be school-based but also allows for experiences in non-school settings such as hospitals and clinics. Expectations are year-long with assignments each term. Case presentations and group supervision during the university-based practicum seminar, led by a doctoral level licensed psychologist, will be a vital component to this process.

1 credits  
SPSY 771  — Seminar in Integration of Cognitive Development and Behavior  

This second year course will focus on the integration of the cognitive bases of behavior and lifespan development. By examining increasingly complex cognitive processes from the first appearance of sensory and perceptual abilities, this course will follow both the behavioral and theoretical development of cognition and its impact on behavior.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 772  — Seminar in Integration of Social-Affective Development  

This second year course will focus on the integration of the social-affective bases of behavior and lifespan development. Starting with the development of an infant’s first and most important relationship, this course will follow the development of individuals’ social and affective behavior from infancy through late adulthood and discuss the theoretical models of these behaviors.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 773  — Seminar in Integration of Biological and Physiological Behavior  

This second year course will focus on the integration of the biological and physiological bases of behavior across the lifespan. This course will begin examining the development of critical biological and physiological processes from conception and follow these through childhood adolescence, and adulthood. This course will focus on the major biological systems including the neurological and endocrine systems as well as the development of sensation and perception.

1 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 774  — Seminar in Advanced Integrated Knowledge  

This course will provide students with the opportunity to integrate multiple basic discipline-specific knowledge content areas, including the behavioral and theoretical development of cognitive, social, and affective aspects. Content will focus on the developmental trajectories of representational memory, language, achievement motivation, theory of mind, attachment, social relationships, and emotion regulation and their impact on behavior throughout childhood and adolescence.

2 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 776  — Dissertation Seminar  

The purpose of this course is to promote student knowledge of and support during the dissertation process. Students will meet for class, as well as individually with dissertation committee members, in order to facilitate the completion of all the steps leading to the proposal and final approval of the dissertation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of comprehensive exam.

1, 2 credits  
SPSY 779  — School-Based Externship  

This year-long school-based externship and bimonthly college-based seminar serve as the culminating training experience for the specialist-level certification in school psychology. It is a comprehensive field and classroom experience through which externs are required to integrate the knowledge base and applied skills of school psychology. A major goal of this course will provide externs the opportunity to present and receive feedback on individual cases and experiences.

1 credits  
SPSY 783  — Research Methods  

This course is designed to teach doctoral students the fundamental principles of scientific methodology as applied to psychology and education. The course is intended to provide doctoral students with the ability to be critical consumers of research in the field of school psychology, to enable them to think scientifically and apply this mindset to the evaluation of clinical interventions and educational programs. Upon completion of this course, students will have gained experience in writing a research proposal, translating research problems into testable hypotheses, and considering ethical, professional, and diversity issues related to conducting research with human participants.

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 784  — Statistical Analysis  

This course is designed to teach students essential concepts in planning, selecting, and conducting and interpreting statistical analyses. Course content includes a review of the application of psychometry, basic descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation, and univariate, multivariate and nonparametric data analysis techniques and accompanying statistical tests of significance. Qualitative research design and analysis will also be discussed briefly. Data analyses and classroom demonstrations of data analyses will be conducted with SPSS software. Prerequisite SPSY 783

3 credits  

Lecture

SPSY 786  — Internship  
0-1 credits  
SPSY 790  — Dissertation Seminar  

This course will be the culmination of the qualifying process. The Qualifying Paper that students will have been working on all year on will be completed and defended. The nature of this defense will be agreed upon by the student and Program Director. Possibilities for this will include an oral defense to a committee, a lecture on the topic in a scheduled class, or the production of an online taped presentation.

1, 2 credits  
SPSY 792  — Dissertation Advisement  

After completion of SPED 791 Dissertation Seminar, students continue to work on the completion of their doctoral thesis and meet with dissertation committee members to complete all the steps through final approval. Students register for this course each and every term until they have successfully defended their final dissertation thesis.

1-2 credits  
SPSY 795  — Dissertation Editing  
1 credits  
SPSY 799  — Independent Study  
1-3 credits