Physical Therapy (PT)

PT 601AG  — Clinical Anatomy for Physical Therapists I  

This course constitutes Part 1 of the comprehensive consideration of human anatomy using a regional approach to the human body that is designed for the training of clinicians. The course will cover regional gross and clinical anatomy of the pectoral and pelvic girdles, upper and lower extremities, head and neck. The emphasis is on function, topographic, radiographic correlations, and clinical applications. Surface anatomy, and palpation skills are emphasized, as well as more in-depth analysis of the peripheral nervous system and musculoskeletal system as they relate to clinical skills utilized by physical therapists.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 601BG  — Clinical Anatomy for Physical Therapists II  

This course constitutes Part 2 of the comprehensive consideration of human anatomy using a regional approach to the human body that is designed for the training of clinicians. The course will cover regional gross and clinical anatomy of the neck and spine, thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic cavities. The emphasis is on function, topographic, radiographic correlations, and clinical applications. Surface anatomy, and palpation skills are emphasized, as well as more in-depth analysis of the peripheral nervous system and musculoskeletal system as they relate to clinical skills utilized by physical therapists.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 602AG  — Clinical Kinesiology I  

This is the first course in a two-course series that addresses the study of human movement with an emphasis on functional anatomy, biomechanics, mechanisms of injury, and the relationship of these concepts to examination of the musculoskeletal system. This course focuses on the upper and lower extremities and includes detailed information related to osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, and accessory joint movements.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 602BG  — Clinical Kinesiology II  

This is the second course in a two-course series that addresses the study of human movement with an emphasis on functional anatomy, biomechanics, mechanisms of injury, and the relationship of these concepts to examination of the musculoskeletal system. This course focuses on the spine and includes detailed information related to osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, and accessory joint movements. Examination of gait and posture are addressed, and students will integrate spinal function with static and dynamic posture, as well as during walking.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 603G  — Differential Diagnosis for PT  

This course lays the foundation for an understanding of pathological conditions and their impact on physical therapy management. It begins with an exploration of the physiological function as related to homeostasis in body systems and healing of body tissues. The course is primarily system-based and emphasizes screening for clinical signs and symptoms [presentation] of select patient disorders/diseases, the impact of pathology on physical function, and implications for physical therapy management. The course will also include an introduction in basic principles of pharmacology for physical therapists in preparation for systems-based pharmacology and diagnostic courses.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 604AG  — Clinical Neuroscience I  

This course, the first in a series of two courses, sets the stage for understanding human movement, motor control, and motor learning theory by exploring the structure and function of the motor and somatosensory components of the nervous system. Exploration begins with consideration of how information is transferred within the nervous system (e.g., synaptic transmission) through discovery of motor and somatosensory pathways and how the pathways interact to produce movement. Consideration is also given to mechanisms of pain transmission and modulation. Muscle tone, reflexes and reactions in relation to normal and pathological nervous system function and dysfunction will be considered. Directed laboratory experiences using cadaveric tissue, images of sectioned tissue and models will be included. Structure and function are addressed across the life span.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 604BG  — Clinical Neuroscience II  

This course, the second in the neuroscience series, builds on the concepts and principles addressed in the first course by exploring the impact of vision, hearing, and vestibular function on human movement. The course also addresses “higher” level functions, which include language and communication, memory and learning, and emotions. Neuroplasticity is considered in relation to learning, development of the CNS, and the ability of the CNS to recover after injury. Students explore neuroplasticity, motor learning, and motor control related to common physical therapy interventions based on current evidence. A variety of clinical disorders in the neuromuscular system will be introduced.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 605G  — Clinical Exercise Science and Wellness  

The concepts and principles addressed in this course provide the foundation on which physical therapy students can create individualized exercise programs for healthy individuals and those with acute or chronic pathology. Key concepts include: the role of nutrition in providing energy for physical activity and exercise, the structure and function of physiological systems within the body and how they interact to promote movement, and physiological responses to different types of exercise and training. The physiology of obesity and weight-management strategies, physical fitness across the life span, the impact of gender, culture and race/ethnicity on fitness, and the behavioral aspects of participation in exercise and fitness will be explored. The course will also address the role of physical therapy in relation to the U.S. Health and Human Services Healthy People agenda, which emphasizes prevention and wellness.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 611AG  — Physical Therapy Exam I  

This course focuses on developing basic examination knowledge and skills that physical therapists use to gather data and make decisions about diagnoses and prognoses (evaluation) for developing a plan of care. Students learn to obtain a medical history and conduct systems review for dysfunction in various body systems (integumentary, cardiovascular & pulmonary, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and cognitive). Specific tests and measures addressed include vital sign testing, tone/motor control and coordination, sensory integrity and peripheral reflexes, muscle strength (manual muscle testing), range of motion and muscle length. Throughout the course, students enhance their skills in palpation and practice techniques of basic patient management, such as positioning and draping. Basic principles of documentation are emphasized, and students learn to document examination findings.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 611BG  — Physical Therapy Exam II  

This course continues examination and evaluation with emphasis on functional ability and performance for patients in hospital, skilled nursing and home settings. Students will be introduced to medical monitoring devices, aseptic technique, and the use of universal precautions required for safe clinical practice in all settings. Relevant health status and contributing medical conditions will be explored in relation to functional mobility and locomotion. The primary emphasis of examination will include assessment of: balance and postural control for basic ADL and function, bed mobility, wheelchair mobility, transfers and gait. Implementation and general progression of functional training in these aspects of mobility will be introduced. Students will continue to practice documentation for patients in these hospital settings.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 612G  — Cardio and Pulmonary Management  

This course focuses on management of patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunction. The major emphasis is on comprehensive examination, evaluation and therapeutic interventions for cardiovascular/pulmonary of these patients, including those with integumentary, musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders. Physical therapy management for patients who are acutely ill with cardiac, pulmonary, or vascular disease and their progression through the continuum of care is also addressed. Pathologies presented are dealt with from the perspective of medical, surgical and rehabilitative interventions.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 613G  — Integumentary Management  

The physical therapy management of patients with integumentary system disorders, wounds and burns, is the focus of this course. The pathophysiology of integumentary disorders is addressed in addition to the comprehensive physical therapy management of patients with related acute and sub-acute diseases that require skilled and intermediate levels of medical care.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 614G  — Pharmacology and Medical Diagnostics: CVP and Integumentary Dysfunction  

This course addresses clinical pharmacology and medical diagnostic tests for patients with CVP & Integumentary dysfunction. The emphasis in pharmacology is on the impact of drugs used to treat these conditions on physical therapy patient management, including recognition of adverse reactions. Diagnostic tests will include lab values, imaging, and other studies related to cardiac, vascular and pulmonary function, as well as tests for assessing wound status (e.g., infection). The impact of drugs based on age, gender, race, etc. will be addressed, as well as testing for conditions across the lifespan.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 615G  — Clinical Interventions I  

This course requires students to integrate foundational knowledge and skills for determining and implementing appropriate physical therapy interventions that address impairments in body structure/function, activity restrictions, and participation across the lifespan and continuum of care. The primary focus is on integrating functional training, and therapeutic exercise pertinent for individuals with advanced integumentary disorders, cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunction. Principles of biophysical and electrical agent will also be presented and emphasis will be on application of these modalities for individuals w/ integumentary and cardiopulmonary disorders.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 621AG  — Principles of Evidenced-Based Practice  

This is the first in series of courses dealing with evidence-based practice (EBP). The emphasis in this course is on laying the foundation for understanding the importance and nature of EBP. The major focus is on the first two of the five steps of EBP: Ask and Acquire. Students will begin to develop strategies for asking clinical questions and for searching for evidence to find answers.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 621BG  — Composition of Evidenced-Based Practice & Design  

This course, the second in a series of five courses, begins to lay the foundation for the third step of EBP (Appraise) by exploring various research designs used in rehabilitation research and addressing analysis of research results based on statistical description and inference. Principles of subject selection, including determination of appropriate sample size, and internal and external validity are addressed in relation to each of the designs explored in the course. Each design will be discussed in terms of its placement on the hierarchy of evidence. Common tests for significance will be explored in terms of how the tests are performed and interpreted, as well as the appropriateness of specific tests based on the research question and design utilized.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 631AG  — Professional Engagement I, Introduction  

This is the first in a four-course sequence in which the knowledge, skills, and values in the physical therapy profession is explored. Students will explore the history and future of the profession, while being introduced to the scope of physical therapy practice, standards of care, core values, jurisprudence and code of ethics. The APTA Code of Ethics and Core Values documents related to the delivery of culturally competent physical therapy services, legal and ethical standards of practice will serve as the foundation for expectation of professional behaviors in communication and practice documentation within various patient care settings. Governance of the recognized professional organization, the American Physical Therapy Association, will also be explored and discussed in detail.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 631BG  — Professional Engagement II, Health Systems Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

This course is designed to expose students to the tenets of the United States healthcare system, current physical therapy practice settings, and other key components of various healthcare delivery models, such as patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations. Students will investigate issues related to health disparities that exist as a consequence of race/ethnicity, age, or socioeconomic status and will be prepared to recognize the need for interprofessional collaboration and patient-centered practice to improve the effectiveness of healthcare and quality of life and health for those in need of social services. Through active interdisciplinary seminar discussion, students will address methods for implementing culturally competent care, improving health literacy, and addressing issues related to access to health systems.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 632G  — Teaching and Learning  

Basic educational principles of teaching and learning as applied to physical therapy practice and with respect to learning styles across diverse populations are explored in this course. A variety of instructional strategies will be utilized to prepare students to teach patients, family members, peers, and other health professionals. Implementation of current technology for effective education will be introduced.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 711AG  — Musculoskeletal I Management  

This course is the first of a two-course sequence addressing the management of patients with problems of the musculoskeletal system. This course emphasizes the pathological, medical and surgical considerations, and physical therapy examination and intervention associated with the upper half in relation to trauma, degenerative changes, and overuse syndromes in daily activity, recreation, sports, and industry.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 711BG  — Musculoskeletal II Management  

This is the second course in a two-course sequence dealing with the musculoskeletal system from the perspective of pathological, medical, and surgical considerations and physical therapy examination and intervention. This course will focus on dysfunction of the lower half in relation to trauma, degenerative changes, and overuse syndromes in daily or work activity, recreation, sports, and industry.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 712AG  — Pharmacology and Medical Diagnostics, Musculoskeletal Disorders  

This course addresses clinical pharmacology and medical diagnostic tests for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The emphasis in pharmacology is on the impact of drugs used to treat these conditions on physical therapy patient management, including recognition of adverse reactions. Diagnostic tests will include lab values, imaging, and other studies related to the medical diagnosis of musculoskeletal dysfunction. The impact of drugs based on age, gender, race, etc. will be addressed, as well as testing for conditions across the lifespan.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 712BG  — Pharmacology and Medical Diagnostics, Neuromuscular Disorders  

This course addresses clinical pharmacology and medical diagnostic tests for patients with neuromuscular dysfunction. The emphasis in pharmacology is on the impact of drugs used to treat these conditions on physical therapy patient management, including recognition of adverse reactions. Diagnostic tests will include lab values, imaging, and other studies related to the diagnosis of neurological disorders. The impact of drugs based on age, gender, race, etc. will be addressed, as well as testing for conditions across the lifespan.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 713G  — Assistive Technology: P&O  

This course focuses on the design and function of assistive technology to include ‘specialty’ wheelchairs, orthotics, prosthetics, and other technology designed to improve function. Students will explore various types of adaptive devices available and relate biomechanical principles and research evidence to recommend and effectively use assistive technology. The relationship between normal and pathologic gait in individuals who use orthotic and prosthetic devices will also be addressed. Comprehensive physical therapy management, which includes all elements of the patient/client management model will be emphasized for patients with amputation/lower limb loss.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 714AG  — Clinical Interventions II  

This course requires students to integrate foundational knowledge and skills for determining and implementing appropriate physical therapy interventions that address impairments in body structure/function, activity restrictions, and participation across the lifespan and continuum of care. Students will learn to implement functional activities progression, therapeutic exercise and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, theory and application of dry needling, soft tissue mobilization, and the use of biophysical and electrical agents pertinent for patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 714BG  — Clinical Interventions III  

This course requires students to integrate foundational knowledge and skills for determining and implementing appropriate physical therapy interventions to address impairments in body structure/function, activity restrictions, and participation across the lifespan and continuum of care for patients. Students will learn to implement therapeutic exercise and/or functional activities progression for patients with various body system impairments from acute injury to return to prior level of function across the lifespan. Therapeutic exercises, aquatic therapy, therapeutic activities, neuromuscular re-education exercises, and plyometrics will be addressed in detail across multiple patient populations.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 714CG  — Clinical Interventions IV  

This course requires students to integrate foundational knowledge and skills for determining and implementing appropriate physical therapy interventions that address impairments in body structure/ function, activity restrictions, and participation across the lifespan and continuum of care for patients with neurological health conditions and other special populations in physical therapy. Students will learn to implement functional activities progression, therapeutic exercise, manual interventions, and biophysical agents on patients with neurologic disorders and special populations. Interventions will also include as appropriate proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, body-weight support, constraint-induced therapy, and functional electrical stimulation

1, 2 credits  

Lecture

PT 715AG  — Neuromuscular I Management  

This course is the first of a two-course sequence addressing the management of patients with neuromuscular disorders with primary emphasis on birth to adolescence. This course focuses on the pathological, medical and surgical considerations, and physical therapy management for patients with congenital and developmental abnormalities, and acquired neuromuscular disorders.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 715BG  — Neuromuscular II Management  

This course is the second of a two-course sequence addressing the management of patients with neuromuscular disorders. This course focuses on the pathological, medical and surgical considerations, and physical therapy management for patients with neurological disorders after adolescence throughout adulthood. Contemporary concepts of motor control, as well as more traditional neurodevelopmental approaches, are explored.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 716G  — Complex Multi System Disorders  

This course offers students’ opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills learned throughout the curriculum with application to physical therapy management of patients with complex pathologies [affecting more than one body system]. Clinical manifestations of disease will be correlated with pathology and pathophysiology, and students will be required to explore the medical management, including diagnostic & pharmacological management of problems, Course and prognosis for pathologies addressed, and the consequences of system involvement on function and participation in life.

4 credits  

Lecture

PT 722AG  — Evidence-Based Practice, Project I  

This is the first of a three course series leading to a capstone research product in the DPT program. Students will begin to apply knowledge and skills learned from Principles of Evidence-Based Practice. In this course, students will develop a research proposal and successfully complete all appropriate applications for the Institutional Review Board.

1 credits  

Lecture

PT 722BG  — Evidence-Based Practice, Project II  

This is the second of a three course series leading to a capstone research product in the DPT program. In this course, students will complete data collection for proposed research projects, perform appropriate literature searches for primary and secondary analyses, obtain relevant literature, and complete an abstract representing the initial portions of a written manuscript (via an iterative process with peers, the instructors and clinical/ program faculty advisors involved in the project. This endeavor is the continuation of the project which was formally developed in PT 722AG/BG and the IRB process successfully completed.

1 credits  

Lecture

PT 722CG  — Evidence-Based Practice, Project III  

This is the culminating course in a three-course research experience in the DPT program. In this course, students will complete a written manuscript, poster or other scholarly product through an iterative process with peers, the instructors and clinical faculty or program faculty advisors involved in the project. This endeavor is the continuation of the project which was formally developed in previous courses, data collected, and the initial portions of the manuscript were completed.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 722G  — Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice Statistics  

This course continues to build the foundation for the third step of EBP (Appraise) by addressing analysis of research results based on statistical description and inference. Common tests for significance will be explored in terms of how the tests are performed and interpreted, as well as the appropriateness of specific tests based on the research question and design utilized. Students will perform and interpret basic statistical tests using SPSS. Students will continue the critical appraisal begun in the course on design by assessing the appropriateness of the statistics utilized and the conclusions drawn from the results of the tests.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 723G  — Evaluating the Evidence, Diagnostic Tests  

Building on content from previous EBP courses, students critically appraise studies related to diagnostic tests, clinical measures, prognoses, clinical prediction rules, & outcomes. The emphasis is on assessing study credibility and the importance of results to clinical practice. Students will review two studies related to one of the areas and present their analyses in a formal presentation.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 724G  — Evaluating the Evidence, Interventions  

The emphasis in this course is on assessing studies related to physical therapy interventions with emphasis on study credibility and results, as well as the importance of results to clinical practice. Students will review of two studies on specific PT intervention and present their appraisals formally.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 731G  — Psychosocial Aspects of Health Management  

Psychosocial aspects of health management essential for recognizing and responding to reactions of patients, family, and therapists to behavioral and mental illness, cognitive and physical disorders, and catastrophic illness are the focus of this course. Students will explore constructs of 'identity [self]' related to 'healthy' human development and wellness across the lifespan. Values, moral and ethical belief systems of various groups of people--across age, race, culture, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status – will be examined with respect to influences on physical, psychosocial, and cultural aspects of an individual's growth and development. The role and responsibilities of physical therapists, health care team members, and advocacy groups in facilitating adjustment to illness and disability are discussed.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 732G  — Professional Engagement III, Practice Management Policy and Ethics  

The third course in this series is designed to advance student’s knowledge of policy, legal and ethical aspects of physical therapy practice management including: marketing/ budgeting, supervision of staff, personnel development, quality improvement and federal guidelines concerning the Americans with Disabilities Act within the scope of practice of physical therapy. The business aspects of healthcare, application and documentation of processes for reimbursement will be investigated. Social responsibility and advocacy for legislative change to state and federal regulations related to the provision of health care services will be discussed.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 733G  — Professional Engagement IV, Lifelong Commitment  

In this final course in the series, students will formulate a ‘professional development plan’ for continued professional engagement in physical therapy and other health care organizations. Students will assess their professional growth since entry into the program and will complete program outcomes surveys and other requirements for graduation. Mechanisms for seeking out community resources, mentors, networking in professional organizations and ways to foster the student’s future role of becoming a clinical instructor will be emphasized. Developing skills needed to successfully secure licensure as a PT and preparation for National Physical Therapy Examination will be completed.

1 credits  

Lecture

PT 741G  — Clinical Experience I  

This 8-week clinical experience is the first in a three-part clinical practice series and follows successful completion of all prior course work. The clinical placement is designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply foundational knowledge and skills learned in the program. The experience will take place in a variety of settings reflective of current physical therapy practice. Students will practice under the direct supervision of a licensed practicing clinician.

8 credits  

Lecture

PT 742AG  — Clinical Experience II  

This 13-week clinical experience is the second in a three-part clinical practice series and follows successful completion of all prior course work. The clinical placement is designed to provide students with an opportunity to advance their clinical application of knowledge and skills learned in the first two years of the program. The experience will take place in a variety of settings where the student will practice under the direct supervision of a licensed practicing clinician.

13 credits  

Lecture

PT 742BG  — Clinical Experience III  

This 13-week clinical internship is sequential to Clinical Internship II where placement will continue either within the same setting or in a new setting for adequate exposure to a variety of physical therapy clinical and community practice settings. This internship is designed for students to gain greater proficiency and synthesis of clinical skills and clinical reasoning learned across all years of the DPT program. Under the direct supervision by qualified physical therapists, students will demonstrate the ability to make sound clinical decisions for management of patient problems in a moderately paced environment.

13 credits  

Lecture

PT 742G  — Clinical Experience II  

This 8-week clinical experience is the second in a four-part clinical practice series and follows successful completion of all prior course work. The clinical placement is designed to provide students with an opportunity to advance their clinical application of knowledge and skills learned in the first two years of the program. The experience will take place in a variety of settings where the student will practice under the direct supervision of a licensed practicing clinician and are expected to achieve ‘advanced beginner’ to ‘advanced intermediate level’ on the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument by conclusion of this experience.

13 credits  

Lecture

PT 743AG  — Clinical Experience III  

This 8-week clinical internship follows successful completion of all prior coursework and is designed to provide the student with opportunity to advance physical therapy practice management and clinical problem solving skills learned from all previous courses. The experience will take place in a variety of settings reflective of current physical therapy practice. Students will practice under the direct supervision of a licensed practicing clinician and are expected to achieve ‘advanced intermediate to ‘entry-level’ on the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument by conclusion of this experience.

13 credits  

Lecture

PT 743BG  — Clinical Education IV  

This 12-week clinical internship is sequential to Clinical Internship III where placement will continue either within the same or in a new setting for adequate exposure to a variety of physical therapy clinical and community practice settings. This internship is designed for students to gain greater proficiency and synthesis of clinical skills and clinical reasoning learned across all years of the DPT program. Under the direct supervision by qualified physical therapists, students will demonstrate the ability to make sound clinical decisions for management of patient problems in a moderately paced environment and are expected to achieve ‘entry–level’ or ‘beyond-entry level’ performance on the APTA Clinical Performance Instrument by conclusion of this experience.

12 credits  

Lecture

PT 981EG  — Advanced Prosthetic Rehabilitation Training  

This elective course is designed to enhance knowledge of prosthetic design and to discover a broad scope of exercises to promote optimal gait function for adults living with lower limb amputation. Implementation of appropriate outcome measures for quality of life and functional ability will be discussed. Current and clinically useful approaches to prosthetic design/fit, and advances in rehabilitation management using a holistic philosophy for optimizing health and wellness will be emphasized. Intervention strategies focusing on improved balance, prosthetic gait, fall risk/fall recovery, and running will be taught through hands-on interaction with individuals with lower limb amputation.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 982EG  — Directed Study in PT Research  

This elective course is designed for students to focus on preparing a completed research study [or component of] for poster, platform, or publication under the guidance of a faculty advisor.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 983EG  — Integrative Dry Needling  

The purpose of this elective course is to advance student knowledge and skills in the application of dry needling in physical therapy practice. Preliminary research will be explored, which supports use of dry needling to improve pain control, reduce muscle tension/increase range of motion, and normalize dysfunction of the motor units – i.e. nerve impulses that are transmitted to muscles.. Information will be developed and integrated across the curriculum. The course is intended to meet state standards for dry needling and students will receive a certificate upon completion.

3 credits  

Lecture

PT 984EG  — Professional Service in Physical Therapy: Leadership  

This course is designed for students to explore and participate in physical therapy professional leadership roles. Students will fulfill potential through effective leadership skills training in areas such as team building, strategic planning, and decision-making. The primary focus will be on development, implementation, and oversight of a student-led leadership project.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 985EG  — Community Service: Social Responsibility and Advocacy  

This elective course is designed for students to explore and participate in community service opportunities, and/or conferences for individuals w/ health conditions [i.e. Camps for children w/ disability; Special Olympics, Triathlons’, Amputee Coalition National Conference, Challenged Athlete Foundation, Adaptive Sport opportunities, provision of physical therapy services to patients at the Clarkston Community Health Center, etc. Volunteer opportunities may also occur through Church/Religious Mission or Medical Mission trips, Habitat for Humanity, Meals on Wheels, etc.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 986EG  — Special Topics in Anatomy  

This elective course is an advanced laboratory course designed to challenge students with an in-depth understanding of clinical human anatomy. Students are expected to create an anatomical teaching aid that may include an advanced model, prosected specimen, game, or open education resource (OER). Alternatively, students may investigate an anatomical variation that was noted in PT601G. The artifact created by students must fulfill one of the stated Course Learning Objectives (CLOs). Essentially, students will create a project that may satisfy requirements for publication as a manuscript or open education resource (OER), or that may serve as a teaching model for future courses.

2 credits  
PT 987EG  — Special Topics in Pediatrics  

This course is designed for students to expand their knowledge of pediatric physical therapy and integrate the best available evidence into practice. To build on information presented in core pediatric courses, students will explore advanced assessment tools and practice gathering accurate and reliable data to help guide critical clinical decision-making. Students will participate in complex gait and orthotic assessments and have opportunities to fabricate simple orthoses for pediatric clients. A primary objective of this elective is for students to select intervention activities that engage and motivate children of all ages. Effective collaboration with families and health providers will be emphasized throughout the course.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 988EG  — Advanced Topics in Orthopedics  

This course is designed for students to enhance and integrate the material from the Institute of Physical Art workshops Functional Mobilization I, Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation, and Core Strategies First. Active integration of workshop material with program didactic information will enhance examination, evaluation, and intervention models and strategies. Advanced clinical manual skills are also practiced and incorporated with those manual skills taught in the academic program.

2 credits  

Lecture

PT 989EG  — Education & Teaching  

This course is designed for students to explore and participate in physical therapy education through teaching as an assistant in Physical Therapy Examination I &/or II, or Clinical Anatomy for Physical Therapists. Students will fulfill potential demonstrating instructional skills in areas such as designing lesson plans, creating objectives for learning modules, developing and implementing teaching and learning modules, and gauging the effectiveness of those modules.

2 credits  

Lecture